“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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one day some sixty or seventy of them  assembled, rode off a few miles east,  and stopped a few waggons, which were  moving to , and turned them  back. It was manifested from their  threatnings and actions, that they were  determined, to fall upon the saints and  drive them out of the , if they  could. It was equally manifest, that  the saints were disposed to defend  themselves against mobs, even to the  sheding of blood.
At that time it was seen that if  something was not done to stop it,  blood would be shed; (for the mob par ty were resolved on driving, and the  saints were determined not to be driv en by them, without first trying their  strength;) Wherefore the most intelli gent, and respectable citizens of the  , who had always appeared  friendly to the saints, held a meeting, in  which they appointed a committee, and  also requested the saints to appoint a  committee, to meet their committee  near , on a day appointed to  confer with each other; and see if  something could not be done, to evade  the storm, which appeared to be fast  gathering.
The committee met at the appointed  time, and a proposition was made by  the citizen’s committee, to the other,  to this effect.
That whereas, the people of  had kindly received the saints in their  distress, when it was expected, that  they would soon return to ,  and not think of making a  permanent home: and whereas, almost  three years had passed away since,  and the prospect of their returning to   was less at that time than  it was years before; and that a portion  of the citizens of were dis satisfied, to have them remain where  they were any longer. Therefore the  committee in behalf of the citizens  requested, that they (the sain[t]s) should  look themselves a new location, either  in some unsettled part of the , or  othrewise go out of the , as suited  them best. The committee disclaimed  all right, to request any such thing; they  said, that they knew very well, that the  saints had just as good a right there, as  themselves, but they thought that consid ering the opposition that there was to  them it would be better for them,  to go where they could be more by  themselves; and they even reccommen ded their gathering together, and living  altogether by themselves. They fur ther said, that if they would consent to  go, and seek a new location, they would  send a committee with them, who was  acquainted with the country, who would  pilot them, in looking it out. How ever a location had already been selected,  and about sixteen hundred acres of land  purchased but a short time previous; and  they were willing to go, and some of them  were making preparations to move there  soon before the meeting of the commit tee: Wherefore the committee, on the  part of the church, consented to the  proposition made to them; and then all  parted with apparent good feelings.—  Soon afterwards three, on the part of the  church, and two pilots, started to view  the country; they travelled a number of  days, in the new settlements, towards  the N. W. corner of the ; and  they finally concluded, that the place  previously selected, now known as should be the place, where  they would settle; there being but a few  inhabitants, in a district of country large  enough for a county; and they, in gen eral, willing to sell out.
Upon these movements the mob spirit  in measurably subsided, and  the saints prepared, and moved to their  new settlement, as fast as their circum stances would permit; pleased with the  idea of settling together by themselves. [p. 51]
one day some sixty or seventy of them assembled, rode off a few miles east, and stopped a few waggons, which were moving to , and turned them back. It was manifested from their threatnings and actions, that they were determined, to fall upon the saints and drive them out of the , if they could. It was equally manifest, that the saints were disposed to defend themselves against mobs, even to the sheding of blood.
At that time it was seen that if something was not done to stop it, blood would be shed; (for the mob party were resolved on driving, and the saints were determined not to be driven by them, without first trying their strength;) Wherefore the most intelligent, and respectable citizens of the , who had always appeared friendly to the saints, held a meeting, in which they appointed a committee, and also requested the saints to appoint a committee, to meet their committee near , on a day appointed to confer with each other; and see if something could not be done, to evade the storm, which appeared to be fast gathering.
The committee met at the appointed time, and a proposition was made by the citizen’s committee, to the other, to this effect.
That whereas, the people of had kindly received the saints in their distress, when it was expected, that they would soon return to , and not think of making a permanent home: and whereas, almost three years had passed away since, and the prospect of their returning to was less at that time than it was years before; and that a portion of the citizens of were dissatisfied, to have them remain where they were any longer. Therefore the committee in behalf of the citizens requested, that they (the saints) should look themselves a new location, either in some unsettled part of the , or othrewise go out of the , as suited them best. The committee disclaimed all right, to request any such thing; they said, that they knew very well, that the saints had just as good a right there, as themselves, but they thought that considering the opposition that there was to them it would be better for them, to go where they could be more by themselves; and they even reccommended their gathering together, and living altogether by themselves. They further said, that if they would consent to go, and seek a new location, they would send a committee with them, who was acquainted with the country, who would pilot them, in looking it out. However a location had already been selected, and about sixteen hundred acres of land purchased but a short time previous; and they were willing to go, and some of them were making preparations to move there soon before the meeting of the committee: Wherefore the committee, on the part of the church, consented to the proposition made to them; and then all parted with apparent good feelings.— Soon afterwards three, on the part of the church, and two pilots, started to view the country; they travelled a number of days, in the new settlements, towards the N. W. corner of the ; and they finally concluded, that the place previously selected, now known as should be the place, where they would settle; there being but a few inhabitants, in a district of country large enough for a county; and they, in general, willing to sell out.
Upon these movements the mob spirit in measurably subsided, and the saints prepared, and moved to their new settlement, as fast as their circumstances would permit; pleased with the idea of settling together by themselves. [p. 51]
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