“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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mined to enjoy their rights or die; they  therefore went forward to vote, but  were seized by the opposing party and  attacted, and thus a fight commenced.  But some of our people knocked down  several of the robbers, and thus cleared  the ground and maintained their  rights, though vastly unequal in num bers. The news of this affair soon  spread far and wide, and cuased the  people to rally, some for liberty and  some to support the robbers in their  daring outrages. About one hundred  and fifty of those who were on the side  of liberty, marched to the spot next  day, and went to the residence of the  leaders in this outrage, and soon an  agreement was signed for peace, But  this was of short duration, for the con spirators were stirred up throughout  the whole , being alarmed for  fear the Mormons, as they called them,  should become so formidable as to  maintain their rights and liberties,  insomuch that they could no more  drive and plunder them. About this  time, meetings were held by the rob bers in Carroll, Saline, and other coun ties, in which they openly declared  their treasonable and murderous inten tions of driving the citizens who belong ed to our society from their counties,  and if possible, from the . Reso lutions to this effect were published in  the journals of Upper , and this  without a single remark of disapproba tion. Nay more this murderous gang  when assembled and painted like Indian  warriors, and when openly committing  murder, robbery, and house burning,  were denominated citizens, white peo ple, &c., in most of the papers of the  ; while our society who stood firm  in the cause of liberty and law, were  denominated Mormons, in contradis tinction to the appelation of citizens,  whites &c, as if we had been some  savage tribe, or some colored race of  foreigners. The robbers soon assem bled, to the number of several hundred,  under arms, and rendezvoused in , being composed of indi viduals from many of the counties  around. Here they commenced firing  upon our citizens, and taking prisoners.  Our people made no resistence, except  to assemble on their own ground for  defence. They also made oath before  the Circuit Judge, , to the  above outrages. Five hundred men  were then ordered into service, under  the command of ,  and Brigadier Generals and  . These were soon mustered  and marched through , and  took their stand in ,  where some of them remained thirty  days. The robbers were somewhat  awed by these prompt measures, so  that they did not proceed farther at  that time in , but they proceeded  to , a small town in Carroll  county, which was mostly settled by  our people. Here they laid siege for  several days, and subsisted by plunder  and robbery, watching every opportu nity to fire upon our citizens. At this  time they had one field piece, and were  headed by a Presbyterian priest by the  name of , who, it is said,  tended prayer, night and morning, at  tha [the] head of the gang. In this siege  they say that they killed a number of  our people. They also turned one  , and his wife and  children out of doors when sick, and set  fire to their house, and burned it to  ashes before their eyes. At length  they succeeded in driving every citi zen from the place, to the sacrifice of  every thing which they could not take  with them. [p. 82]
mined to enjoy their rights or die; they therefore went forward to vote, but were seized by the opposing party and attacted, and thus a fight commenced. But some of our people knocked down several of the robbers, and thus cleared the ground and maintained their rights, though vastly unequal in numbers. The news of this affair soon spread far and wide, and cuased the people to rally, some for liberty and some to support the robbers in their daring outrages. About one hundred and fifty of those who were on the side of liberty, marched to the spot next day, and went to the residence of the leaders in this outrage, and soon an agreement was signed for peace, But this was of short duration, for the conspirators were stirred up throughout the whole , being alarmed for fear the Mormons, as they called them, should become so formidable as to maintain their rights and liberties, insomuch that they could no more drive and plunder them. About this time, meetings were held by the robbers in Carroll, Saline, and other counties, in which they openly declared their treasonable and murderous intentions of driving the citizens who belonged to our society from their counties, and if possible, from the . Resolutions to this effect were published in the journals of Upper , and this without a single remark of disapprobation. Nay more this murderous gang when assembled and painted like Indian warriors, and when openly committing murder, robbery, and house burning, were denominated citizens, white people, &c., in most of the papers of the ; while our society who stood firm in the cause of liberty and law, were denominated Mormons, in contradistinction to the appelation of citizens, whites &c, as if we had been some savage tribe, or some colored race of foreigners. The robbers soon assembled, to the number of several hundred, under arms, and rendezvoused in , being composed of individuals from many of the counties around. Here they commenced firing upon our citizens, and taking prisoners. Our people made no resistence, except to assemble on their own ground for defence. They also made oath before the Circuit Judge, , to the above outrages. Five hundred men were then ordered into service, under the command of , and Brigadier Generals and . These were soon mustered and marched through , and took their stand in , where some of them remained thirty days. The robbers were somewhat awed by these prompt measures, so that they did not proceed farther at that time in , but they proceeded to , a small town in Carroll county, which was mostly settled by our people. Here they laid siege for several days, and subsisted by plunder and robbery, watching every opportunity to fire upon our citizens. At this time they had one field piece, and were headed by a Presbyterian priest by the name of , who, it is said, tended prayer, night and morning, at tha [the] head of the gang. In this siege they say that they killed a number of our people. They also turned one , and his wife and children out of doors when sick, and set fire to their house, and burned it to ashes before their eyes. At length they succeeded in driving every citizen from the place, to the sacrifice of every thing which they could not take with them. [p. 82]
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