“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 99
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and what they left behind them, made  a prey of.
, at last got so near the  mob, that they left their cannon and  fled. He took the cannon, and returned  to , and thus ended the scene  of destruction. It is necessary for a  proper understanding of this matter,  about the destruction of property, for  the reader to know that the saints had  bought a heavy portion of ; for which, there are docu ments now to show, and were to have  possession in a short time. Let it be  noticed that the mob, in these bur nings, had little to lose; they had got  pay, for both their houses, and their  lands, and their whole object was, to  drive the saints from them, and keep  both their lands and their pay; which  by the assistance of ,  they have been enabled to do. The  mob declared, while they were selling  their lands, that they would do so, and  if they could not accomplish their object  any other way, they would burn their  houses, and report the saints had done  it. This can be proven by Mr. Uriah  B. Powel[l].
After the mob was dispersed, and  their cannon taken, the people from  , returned home, in hopes of  having peace; but this hope proved to be  vain, for , who had been  very active in the mob, and a comman der of one of their companies, that was  painted, commenced collecting his pain ted and scattered forces on a stream,  that was called the Grindstone. After  he had got as he supposed, a sufficient  number of them collected and well pain ted he came into , and  took cattle and horses &c.; and the peo ple of had to set guards, to  protect their property.”—See ’s History, entitled “An Appeal to  the American People”—Page 40.
to be continued. [p. 99]
and what they left behind them, made a prey of.
, at last got so near the mob, that they left their cannon and fled. He took the cannon, and returned to , and thus ended the scene of destruction. It is necessary for a proper understanding of this matter, about the destruction of property, for the reader to know that the saints had bought a heavy portion of ; for which, there are documents now to show, and were to have possession in a short time. Let it be noticed that the mob, in these burnings, had little to lose; they had got pay, for both their houses, and their lands, and their whole object was, to drive the saints from them, and keep both their lands and their pay; which by the assistance of , they have been enabled to do. The mob declared, while they were selling their lands, that they would do so, and if they could not accomplish their object any other way, they would burn their houses, and report the saints had done it. This can be proven by Mr. Uriah B. Powell.
After the mob was dispersed, and their cannon taken, the people from , returned home, in hopes of having peace; but this hope proved to be vain, for , who had been very active in the mob, and a commander of one of their companies, that was painted, commenced collecting his painted and scattered forces on a stream, that was called the Grindstone. After he had got as he supposed, a sufficient number of them collected and well painted he came into , and took cattle and horses &c.; and the people of had to set guards, to protect their property.”—See ’s History, entitled “An Appeal to the American People”—Page 40.
to be continued. [p. 99]
Page 99