“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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head. In the mean time, the painted  robbers and murderers under the com mand of one , came pouring in  from the west, to strengthen the enemy,  and another company of murderers  came in from Carrel [Carroll] county, and were  taken into the ranks of , after  murdering some twenty of our citizens  at Haun’s mill, of which I will give a  particular account hereafter. Thus  both parties were considerably reinforc ed during the night. In the mean time  our people, being determined, if attack ed, to defend their homes, and wives  and children to the last, spent the night  in throwing up a temporary breastwork  of building timber, logs, rails, &c., and  by morning our south side of the city  was fortified with a breastwork, and al so a considerable part of the east and  west sides; the whole line of fortifica tion extending a mile and a half.—  This nights labor may seem incredible;  but it happened that a great quantity of  building materials had been accumula ted near the spot where were thrown  up the breastworks: and this proved an  excellent material for the work. The  next day, towards evening, we were in formed that the had ordered  this force against us, with orders to ex terminate us or drive us from the .  As soon as these facts were ascertain ed, determined not to resist any thing  in the shape of authority, however ty rannical or unconstitutional might be  the proceedings against us; therefore  we had nothing more to do but to sub mit to be massacred or driven at the op tion of our persecutors. waiting on Messrs. J. Smith, , , , and , with a polite re quest from , that we  would surrender ourselves as prisoners  and repair to his camp, and remain  over night, with assurance that as soon  as peaceable arrangements could be en tered into next morning, we should be  released. With this request we readi ly complied, as soon as we were assur ed by the pledge of the honor of the  principal officers, that our lives should  be safe; we accordingly walked near a  mile voluntarily, towards the camp of  the enemy; who, when they saw us co ming came out to meet us by thousands,  with at their head.—  When the haughty rode up to  us, and scarcely passing a compliment,  gave orders to his troops to surround  us, which they did very abruptly, and  we were marched into camp surround ed by thousands of savage looking be ings, many of whom were painted like  Indian warriors. These all set up a  constant yell, like so many blood  hounds let loose on their prey, as if they  had achieved one of the most miracu lous victories which ever dignified the  annals of the world. In camp we were  placed under a strong guard, and before  morning, and several others  were added to our number.s history of the persecution. [p. 116]
head. In the mean time, the painted robbers and murderers under the command of one , came pouring in from the west, to strengthen the enemy, and another company of murderers came in from Carrel [Carroll] county, and were taken into the ranks of , after murdering some twenty of our citizens at Haun’s mill, of which I will give a particular account hereafter. Thus both parties were considerably reinforced during the night. In the mean time our people, being determined, if attacked, to defend their homes, and wives and children to the last, spent the night in throwing up a temporary breastwork of building timber, logs, rails, &c., and by morning our south side of the city was fortified with a breastwork, and also a considerable part of the east and west sides; the whole line of fortification extending a mile and a half.— This nights labor may seem incredible; but it happened that a great quantity of building materials had been accumulated near the spot where were thrown up the breastworks: and this proved an excellent material for the work. The next day, towards evening, we were informed that the had ordered this force against us, with orders to exterminate us or drive us from the . As soon as these facts were ascertained, determined not to resist any thing in the shape of authority, however tyrannical or unconstitutional might be the proceedings against us; therefore we had nothing more to do but to submit to be massacred or driven at the option of our persecutors. waiting on Messrs. J. Smith, , , , and , with a polite request from , that we would surrender ourselves as prisoners and repair to his camp, and remain over night, with assurance that as soon as peaceable arrangements could be entered into next morning, we should be released. With this request we readily complied, as soon as we were assured by the pledge of the honor of the principal officers, that our lives should be safe; we accordingly walked near a mile voluntarily, towards the camp of the enemy; who, when they saw us coming came out to meet us by thousands, with at their head.— When the haughty rode up to us, and scarcely passing a compliment, gave orders to his troops to surround us, which they did very abruptly, and we were marched into camp surrounded by thousands of savage looking beings, many of whom were painted like Indian warriors. These all set up a constant yell, like so many blood hounds let loose on their prey, as if they had achieved one of the most miraculous victories which ever dignified the annals of the world. In camp we were placed under a strong guard, and before morning, and several others were added to our number.s history of the persecution. [p. 116]
Page 116