“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 129
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Installment 8, July 1840


Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, July 1840, 1:129–131. This is the eighth installment in the series. To assist in the transition between ’s narrative at the end of the previous installment and the resumption of excerpts from ’s, this section opens with an introductory paragraph (author unknown) and a copy of governor ’s “extermination order” that closely matches the version found in Rigdon’s Appeal to the American People, pages 47–48. Then follows an account of two incidents of assault by Missourians on Latter-day Saints that occurred prior to the encampment of the Missouri militia outside . The account of these incidents was adapted from Appeal to the American People, pages 46 and 78. Beginning at the bottom of page 129, the installment excerpts from Appeal to the American People, pages 48–51.

A HISTORY, OF THE  PERSECUTION, OF THE CHURCH  OF JESUS CHRIST, OF LAT TER DAY SAINTS IN  .
 
continued.
 
It was before said that the  had long sought an opportunity to de stroy us, and drive us from the ; he  now had all things arranged according  to his liking, an army of several thou sand men were now arayed against a  few, innocent, unofending citizens who  had always been strict to obey the laws  of the ; and several thousand  more were on their march to ,  and all this according to the orders of  the : the following is the ex terminating order under which this  mob millitia were acting.
 
Head Quarters of the Militia,
City of Jefferson,
Oct. 27th 1838.
Sir,
Since the order of the morning to  you, directing you to come with four  hundred mounted men, to be raised  within your Division, I have received,  by , Esq., and Wiley C.  Williams, Esq., one of my aids, infor mation of the most appalling character,  which changes entirely the face of  things, and places the Mormons in the  attitude of an avowed defiance of the  Laws, and of having made war upon  the people of this . Your orders  are therefore, to hasten your operations  and endeavor to reach in  Ray county, with all possible speed.—  The Mormons must be treated as ene mies and must be exterminated, or  driven from the , if necessary for  the public peace.
Their outrages, are beyond all de[s] cription. If you can increase your  force, you are authorized to do so, to  any extent you may think necessary.  I have just issued orders to Major Gen eral Wollock [David Willock] of Marion county, to  raise five hundred men, and to march  them to the northern part of and there to unite with of —who has been or dered with five hundred men, to pro ceed to the same point for the purpose  of intercepting the retreat of the Mor mons to the north. They have been  directed to communicate with you by  express. You can also communicate  with them if you find it necessary. In stead therefore, of proceeding as at  first directed to re-instate the citizens  of in their houses, you will  proceed immediately to and,  there operate against the Mormons.—   of , has  been ordered to have four hundred of  his Brigade in readiness to join you at  . The whole force will be  placed under your command.
(Sined) ,
Govenor and Commander-in-Chief
 
We would here observe that the  large army, or rather mob, just before  they reached , took a man  prisoner by the name of [William] Carey who  was a stranger in the country; and one  of their number, coolly and deliberate ly beat out his brains with the breech of  his gun. He was then thrown into a  wagon and taken with them to their  encampment. His family were not  allowed to see him, or even permitted  to administer to his wants, in the hour  of death; he was given up to his family  a few minutes before he expired.—  This was known by all the officers,  but was considered, probally, an act of  bravery.
An aged man by the name of was taken about the same time and  regardless of grey hairs, that wore ev ident ma[r]ks of hardship in the service  of his , he was struck over the  head with the breech of a gun, and his  skull laid bare: but to return. We  here quote from ’s Appeal to  the American people &c. it being a  well written statement of facts.
To .
This order of ’, was given, as  he, and the whole band of them pre tended, in consequence of the  battle: pretending that he had been sent  there, by legal authority. Now, for [p. 129]

Installment 8, July 1840


Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, July 1840, 1:129–131. This is the eighth installment in the series. To assist in the transition between ’s narrative at the end of the previous installment and the resumption of excerpts from ’s, this section opens with an introductory paragraph (author unknown) and a copy of governor ’s “extermination order” that closely matches the version found in Rigdon’s Appeal to the American People, pages 47–48. Then follows an account of two incidents of assault by Missourians on Latter-day Saints that occurred prior to the encampment of the Missouri militia outside . The account of these incidents was adapted from Appeal to the American People, pages 46 and 78. Beginning at the bottom of page 129, the installment excerpts from Appeal to the American People, pages 48–51.

A HISTORY, OF THE PERSECUTION, OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST, OF LATTER DAY SAINTS IN .
 
continued.
 
It was before said that the had long sought an opportunity to destroy us, and drive us from the ; he now had all things arranged according to his liking, an army of several thousand men were now arayed against a few, innocent, unofending citizens who had always been strict to obey the laws of the ; and several thousand more were on their march to , and all this according to the orders of the : the following is the exterminating order under which this mob millitia were acting.
 
Head Quarters of the Militia,
City of Jefferson,
Oct. 27th 1838.
Sir,
Since the order of the morning to you, directing you to come with four hundred mounted men, to be raised within your Division, I have received, by , Esq., and Wiley C. Williams, Esq., one of my aids, information of the most appalling character, which changes entirely the face of things, and places the Mormons in the attitude of an avowed defiance of the Laws, and of having made war upon the people of this . Your orders are therefore, to hasten your operations and endeavor to reach in Ray county, with all possible speed.— The Mormons must be treated as enemies and must be exterminated, or driven from the , if necessary for the public peace.
Their outrages, are beyond all description. If you can increase your force, you are authorized to do so, to any extent you may think necessary. I have just issued orders to Major General Wollock [David Willock] of Marion county, to raise five hundred men, and to march them to the northern part of and there to unite with of —who has been ordered with five hundred men, to proceed to the same point for the purpose of intercepting the retreat of the Mormons to the north. They have been directed to communicate with you by express. You can also communicate with them if you find it necessary. Instead therefore, of proceeding as at first directed to re-instate the citizens of in their houses, you will proceed immediately to and, there operate against the Mormons.— of , has been ordered to have four hundred of his Brigade in readiness to join you at . The whole force will be placed under your command.
(Sined) ,
Govenor and Commander-in-Chief
 
We would here observe that the large army, or rather mob, just before they reached , took a man prisoner by the name of William Carey who was a stranger in the country; and one of their number, coolly and deliberately beat out his brains with the breech of his gun. He was then thrown into a wagon and taken with them to their encampment. His family were not allowed to see him, or even permitted to administer to his wants, in the hour of death; he was given up to his family a few minutes before he expired.— This was known by all the officers, but was considered, probally, an act of bravery.
An aged man by the name of was taken about the same time and regardless of grey hairs, that wore evident marks of hardship in the service of his , he was struck over the head with the breech of a gun, and his skull laid bare: but to return. We here quote from ’s Appeal to the American people &c. it being a well written statement of facts.
To .
This order of ’, was given, as he, and the whole band of them pretended, in consequence of the battle: pretending that he had been sent there, by legal authority. Now, for [p. 129]
Page 129