“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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, Illinois[.] This was in February, A. D. 1839.
In the May following, the remainder that were in the , were taken to to be tried by a grand jury of the principal mobbers, in order to see if a bill of indictment, could be found as could be expected from the characters of the jury. Bills were found, they obtained a change of venue to Boon[e] county, accordingly the Sheriff of , with guards, started to take them from to Boon county. On their way after journeying a day or two, one evening the guard got drunk they left them, and also made their escape to , Illinois.
Those that were in Jail were brought to trial, but no bill of indictment was found against and Norman Shearer, and they were released and sent home.— A bill was found against , Morris Phelps, and for murder, and also a man by the name of for robbery.— They also obtained a change of venue to Boon co., and were carried thither and put into jail and there remained until the fourth of July. At this time the town was all hilarity and mirth at the celebration. They also made a flag and had it placed over the jail doors. In the evening when the Jailor brought in their suppers, they walked out at the door: that is, , Morris Phelps, and ; continued, the others were closely pursued and was retaken and carried back; but the other two effected their escape to the state of . Some time afterwards had his trial and was acquitted. remains in prison unto this day, 26th October, 1839.
As to those that were left in the Counties of and , they were making all possible exertions to get away all winter, contrary to the stipulations of and , granting them the privilege of staying until spring. Bodies of armed men were riding through the town of in the County of Caldwell, threatening death to them if they were not out in the month of February, and otherwise insulting them. They continued however to exert themselves with all possible means in their power; many of them had no teams nor waggons. Having been robbed, yes completely robbed of all they had, great exertions therefore had to be made by those who had means. Through great exertions and timely perseverance they succeeded in getting them safely into the State of , where we all are now and where we have met with a kind reception.
Public meetings were held in ; contributions raised to assist the suffering, and every exertion which humanity dictated was made for our relief.— But still we are, as a people, poor and destitute. We have been robbed of our all and many of us are without houses, living in tents and waggons. In consequence of our exposure, we have suffered this summer much sickness and numbers have died, and our prospects for the ensuing winter are gloomy. But gloomy as they are, still we are not discouraged. A large majority of us are farmers, but our teams, as well as our flocks and herds and all our farming materials were taken from us. Many who were independent, are now working by days works, to maintain their families, numbers of them old men, sixty years old and upwards.— Such is our true situation, and as such we make our Appeal to the American People. [p. 165]
, Illinois. This was in February, A. D. 1839.
In the May following, the remainder that were in the , were taken to to be tried by a grand jury of the principal mobbers, in order to see if a bill of indictment, could be found as could be expected from the characters of the jury. Bills were found, they obtained a change of venue to Boone county, accordingly the Sheriff of , with guards, started to take them from to Boon county. On their way after journeying a day or two, one evening the guard got drunk they left them, and also made their escape to , Illinois.
Those that were in Jail were brought to trial, but no bill of indictment was found against and Norman Shearer, and they were released and sent home.— A bill was found against , Morris Phelps, and for murder, and also a man by the name of for robbery.— They also obtained a change of venue to Boon co., and were carried thither and put into jail and there remained until the fourth of July. At this time the town was all hilarity and mirth at the celebration. They also made a flag and had it placed over the jail doors. In the evening when the Jailor brought in their suppers, they walked out at the door: that is, , Morris Phelps, and ; continued, the others were closely pursued and was retaken and carried back; but the other two effected their escape to the state of . Some time afterwards had his trial and was acquitted. remains in prison unto this day, 26th October, 1839.
As to those that were left in the Counties of and , they were making all possible exertions to get away all winter, contrary to the stipulations of and , granting them the privilege of staying until spring. Bodies of armed men were riding through the town of in the County of Caldwell, threatening death to them if they were not out in the month of February, and otherwise insulting them. They continued however to exert themselves with all possible means in their power; many of them had no teams nor waggons. Having been robbed, yes completely robbed of all they had, great exertions therefore had to be made by those who had means. Through great exertions and timely perseverance they succeeded in getting them safely into the State of , where we all are now and where we have met with a kind reception.
Public meetings were held in ; contributions raised to assist the suffering, and every exertion which humanity dictated was made for our relief.— But still we are, as a people, poor and destitute. We have been robbed of our all and many of us are without houses, living in tents and waggons. In consequence of our exposure, we have suffered this summer much sickness and numbers have died, and our prospects for the ensuing winter are gloomy. But gloomy as they are, still we are not discouraged. A large majority of us are farmers, but our teams, as well as our flocks and herds and all our farming materials were taken from us. Many who were independent, are now working by days works, to maintain their families, numbers of them old men, sixty years old and upwards.— Such is our true situation, and as such we make our Appeal to the American People. [p. 165]
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