“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, Oct. 1840, 1:184–185. A section of editorial notes in the October 1840 issue of the Times and Seasons, placed several pages after the concluding installment of “History, of the Persecution,” includes the following postscript and endorsement. The author was probably one of the editors of the journal, or .

We this month conclude the history  of the persecution of the church of Je sus Christ of Latter day Saints in , by inserting in our columns the  memorable speech of  to our brethren at —and sure  never a more, unconstitutional and  bloody address, blackened the pages of  history. The sentiments contained in  it are such as make every lover of free dom, every patriotic American citizen,  as well as all civilized men throughout  the world, capable of appreciating the  blessings of freedom, to look upon its  author with contempt. Not only does  he charge them with crimes, of which  they were never guilty but says that if  they did not leave the they “need  not expect mercy, but extermination.”  This was the language of a man high  in authority in that , and for the  noble feats he then performed, has  since sought the suffrages of the Mis sourians to be elevated to the guberna torial chair of that . Sure such a  governor would shed a darker polish  on the blackened aspect of that disgrac ed . For whenever he had a de sire to persecute any one or bring them  to condign punishment, guilty or not  guilty “whatever your innocence is, it  is nothing to me” your “fate is fixed,  your die is cast, your doom is sealed.”  This would be carrying out the princi ple which he then avowed and in which  he was supported by the citizens of that  .
We are knowing to most of the cir cumstances, mentioned in the history  of the persecutions, and that a correct  account has been given, which, has  been proven from time to time, these  things have been placed before the leg islature of , but they have re fused to investigate them, they have [p. 184]

Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, Oct. 1840, 1:184–185. A section of editorial notes in the October 1840 issue of the Times and Seasons, placed several pages after the concluding installment of “History, of the Persecution,” includes the following postscript and endorsement. The author was probably one of the editors of the journal, or .

We this month conclude the history of the persecution of the church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints in , by inserting in our columns the memorable speech of to our brethren at —and sure never a more, unconstitutional and bloody address, blackened the pages of history. The sentiments contained in it are such as make every lover of freedom, every patriotic American citizen, as well as all civilized men throughout the world, capable of appreciating the blessings of freedom, to look upon its author with contempt. Not only does he charge them with crimes, of which they were never guilty but says that if they did not leave the they “need not expect mercy, but extermination.” This was the language of a man high in authority in that , and for the noble feats he then performed, has since sought the suffrages of the Missourians to be elevated to the gubernatorial chair of that . Sure such a governor would shed a darker polish on the blackened aspect of that disgraced . For whenever he had a desire to persecute any one or bring them to condign punishment, guilty or not guilty “whatever your innocence is, it is nothing to me” your “fate is fixed, your die is cast, your doom is sealed.” This would be carrying out the principle which he then avowed and in which he was supported by the citizens of that .
We are knowing to most of the circumstances, mentioned in the history of the persecutions, and that a correct account has been given, which, has been proven from time to time, these things have been placed before the legislature of , but they have refused to investigate them, they have [p. 184]
Page 184