“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 185
image
been repeated in Congress, but no redress has been granted, they have been sounded in the ears of the president, but he could do nothing for us.
What remains to be done, if the nation will not arouse itself in behalf of suffering humanity, and with a voice more terrible than thunder, speak out against a people, who have trod down the inherent rights and privileges of freemen and bring the authors of our suffering and woes, to that punishment which the well being of our country demands? Are the tears of widows, the sobs of orphans, the groans of the dying, and the blood of the innocent, to cry to this people in vain? Where ah! Where, ye American citizens, are those high toned feelings of patriotism? where is the spirit of freedom which animated the bosom of your noble sires, who waded through scenes of carnage and of gore to purchase the glorious privileges which you enjoy, but of which we are denied, although our fathers fought side by side with your’s and many of them fell in the glorious struggle for liberty? Is it extinct? does it not now warm the bosom of the scions of those noble men, who presented a spectacle in their days, to the world at large, an and example worthy of imitation to the latest generation? Shall we appeal to you in vain? will you turn away from the scene, unmoved and unconcerned and suffer it to pass unnoticed; Remember,
 
“He who allows oppression,
Shares the crime.——[”]
 
We hope better things of our countryman and that they will by and by arise in their majesty, dry up the tears of the widow and fatherless, and restore our people to their rightful inheritances and to all the privileges of freemen. [p. 185]
been repeated in Congress, but no redress has been granted, they have been sounded in the ears of the president, but he could do nothing for us.
What remains to be done, if the nation will not arouse itself in behalf of suffering humanity, and with a voice more terrible than thunder, speak out against a people, who have trod down the inherent rights and privileges of freemen and bring the authors of our suffering and woes, to that punishment which the well being of our country demands? Are the tears of widows, the sobs of orphans, the groans of the dying, and the blood of the innocent, to cry to this people in vain? Where ah! Where, ye American citizens, are those high toned feelings of patriotism? where is the spirit of freedom which animated the bosom of your noble sires, who waded through scenes of carnage and of gore to purchase the glorious privileges which you enjoy, but of which we are denied, although our fathers fought side by side with your’s and many of them fell in the glorious struggle for liberty? Is it extinct? does it not now warm the bosom of the scions of those noble men, who presented a spectacle in their days, to the world at large, an and example worthy of imitation to the latest generation? Shall we appeal to you in vain? will you turn away from the scene, unmoved and unconcerned and suffer it to pass unnoticed; Remember,
 
“He who allows oppression,
Shares the crime.——
 
We hope better things of our countryman and that they will by and by arise in their majesty, dry up the tears of the widow and fatherless, and restore our people to their rightful inheritances and to all the privileges of freemen. [p. 185]
Page 185