“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Installment 3, February 1840


Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, Feb. 1840, 1:49–51. This is the third installment of the series. The first three installments were based on a manuscript in the hand of .

A HISTORY, OF THE  PERSECUTION, OF THE CHURCH  OF JESUS CHRIST, OF LAT TER DAY SAINTS IN  .
 
continued.
 
The Governor, , was dis posed to bring the mobbers to justice;  consequently, ten or twelve, witnesses  were subpoened to attend the February  term of the circuit court was ordered to guard them over to  , and back, with his company  of Liberty Blues. The attorney Gen.  was also ordered, or requested, by the   to attend the court, to assist the  , in the investigation.  The witnesses were guarded over to  , and after having been  there a short time, they were visited  by the , accompanied  by the attorney General. They in formed the witnesses, that such was  the excitement prevailing there; that it  was doubtful whether any thing could  be done to bring the mobbers to justice;  that if any should be convicted, they  would only be fined in some trifling  sum, not to exceed $5, at most, just  enough to answer the law. And they  advised the witnesses not to go before  the grand jury, intimating at the same  time, that they might be in danger.—  The witnesses replied, that they had  been ordered there by the court, and  they supposed, that they were still sub ject to the court, or to them, the at tornies. As to the danger, in going  before the grand jury they feared it  not: they were ready and willing to go  and testify to the truth. The attor nies left them, and in a short time af ter, they were informed by , that the Judge, ,  had sent him word, that the witnesses  and guard, were not wanted there any  longer; paraded his men, as  soon, and as well as he could for the  crowd, and immediately marched off,  the witnesses following him. All hopes  were now given up of ever bringing  that people to justice; their hatred to wards the saints, appeared to be una bating; they frequently sent over word  to that they were coming over  to drive them from that place; they  even went so far, as to circulate a pa per in , the object of which  was to obtain volunteers there, to as sist them in driving the saints away.—  In however, they had but  a few friends, (for some time,) and  could not obtain many signers.
A wealthy farmer, by the name of  , living in , who  was then friendly to the saints, and  who was in the habit of sending flour  and whiskey into to sell, (it  generally being higher there than in  , in consequence of the Indian  trade,) sent over one of his negroes  and team with a load, sometime that  fall or winter, they were stopped  on the road by some of the good peo ple of , who mounted the load,  and with axes cut the barrels to pieces,  and wasted the flour and whisky upon  the ground.
In 1834, if we mistake not, an in offensive Br. by the name of Ira J.  Willes went into to hunt  for a lost cow; he was taken by some  of the ruffians residing there, who, after  stripping off his clothes, whipped him  unmercifully. For the credit of , we would state that he was ta ken from the house of a Justice of the  Peace; this is an ensample of upper   peace makers. The same  year, Br. , a very peaci ble man, went to to see a man  who owed him; on his way he was  discovered, and overtaken by some of  that lawless banditti, who beat him  with handspikes, no doubt with an in tent to kill, for that was what they swore they  would do; but his life was  preserved, and he escaped out of their  hands. Thus have that people, un ceasingly abused, and persecuted the  saints whenever they could get an op portunity.
appeared willing to  guard back the saints to [p. 49]

Installment 3, February 1840


Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, Feb. 1840, 1:49–51. This is the third installment of the series. The first three installments were based on a manuscript in the hand of .

A HISTORY, OF THE PERSECUTION, OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST, OF LATTER DAY SAINTS IN .
 
continued.
 
The Governor, , was disposed to bring the mobbers to justice; consequently, ten or twelve, witnesses were subpoened to attend the February term of the circuit court was ordered to guard them over to , and back, with his company of Liberty Blues. The attorney Gen. was also ordered, or requested, by the to attend the court, to assist the , in the investigation. The witnesses were guarded over to , and after having been there a short time, they were visited by the , accompanied by the attorney General. They informed the witnesses, that such was the excitement prevailing there; that it was doubtful whether any thing could be done to bring the mobbers to justice; that if any should be convicted, they would only be fined in some trifling sum, not to exceed $5, at most, just enough to answer the law. And they advised the witnesses not to go before the grand jury, intimating at the same time, that they might be in danger.— The witnesses replied, that they had been ordered there by the court, and they supposed, that they were still subject to the court, or to them, the attornies. As to the danger, in going before the grand jury they feared it not: they were ready and willing to go and testify to the truth. The attornies left them, and in a short time after, they were informed by , that the Judge, , had sent him word, that the witnesses and guard, were not wanted there any longer; paraded his men, as soon, and as well as he could for the crowd, and immediately marched off, the witnesses following him. All hopes were now given up of ever bringing that people to justice; their hatred towards the saints, appeared to be unabating; they frequently sent over word to that they were coming over to drive them from that place; they even went so far, as to circulate a paper in , the object of which was to obtain volunteers there, to assist them in driving the saints away.— In however, they had but a few friends, (for some time,) and could not obtain many signers.
A wealthy farmer, by the name of , living in , who was then friendly to the saints, and who was in the habit of sending flour and whiskey into to sell, (it generally being higher there than in , in consequence of the Indian trade,) sent over one of his negroes and team with a load, sometime that fall or winter, they were stopped on the road by some of the good people of , who mounted the load, and with axes cut the barrels to pieces, and wasted the flour and whisky upon the ground.
In 1834, if we mistake not, an inoffensive Br. by the name of Ira J. Willes went into to hunt for a lost cow; he was taken by some of the ruffians residing there, who, after stripping off his clothes, whipped him unmercifully. For the credit of , we would state that he was taken from the house of a Justice of the Peace; this is an ensample of upper peace makers. The same year, Br. , a very peacible man, went to to see a man who owed him; on his way he was discovered, and overtaken by some of that lawless banditti, who beat him with handspikes, no doubt with an intent to kill, for that was what they swore they would do; but his life was preserved, and he escaped out of their hands. Thus have that people, unceasingly abused, and persecuted the saints whenever they could get an opportunity.
appeared willing to guard back the saints to [p. 49]
Page 49