Appendix: Orson Pratt, A[n] Interesting Account of Several Remarkable Visions, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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twice renewed, instructing him further, and still further,  concerning the great work of God, about to be performed  on the earth. In the morning, he went out to his labour  as usual; but soon the vision was renewed—the Angel  again appeared; and having been informed by the previous  visions of the night, concerning the place where those  records were deposited, he was instructed to go immedi ately and view them.
Accordingly, he repaired to the place, a brief description  of which shall be given, in the words of a gentleman, by  the name of , who has visited the spot.
“As you pass on the mail-road, from , Wayne  county, to , Ontario county, New York, be fore arriving at the little village of , say from  three to four, or about four miles from , you pass  a large hill on the east side of the road. Why I say large,  is because it is as large, perhaps, as any in that country.
“The north end rises quite suddenly until it assumes a  level with the more southerly extremity; and I think, I  may say, an elevation higher than at the south, a short  distance, say half or three-fourths of a mile. As you pass  towards , it lessens gradually, until the surface  assumes its common level, or is broken by other smaller  hills or ridges, water-courses and ravines. I think I am  justified in saying, that this is the highest hill for some  distance round, and I am certain, that its appearance, as it  rises so suddenly from a plain on the north, must attract  the notice of the traveller as he passes by.”—“The north  end,” which has been described as rising suddenly from the  plain, forms “a promontory without timber, but covered  with grass. As you pass to the south, you soon come to  scattering timber, the surface having been cleared by art  or wind; and a short distance further left, you are sur rounded with the common forest of the country. It is  necessary to observe, that even the part cleared, was only  occupied for pasturage; its steep ascent, and narrow sum mit not admitting the plough of the husbandman, with any  degree of ease or profit. It was at the second mentioned  place, where the record was found to be deposited, on the  west side of the hill, not far from the top down its side;  and when myself visited the place in the year 1830, there  were several trees standing—enough to cause a shade in [p. 8]
twice renewed, instructing him further, and still further, concerning the great work of God, about to be performed on the earth. In the morning, he went out to his labour as usual; but soon the vision was renewed—the Angel again appeared; and having been informed by the previous visions of the night, concerning the place where those records were deposited, he was instructed to go immediately and view them.
Accordingly, he repaired to the place, a brief description of which shall be given, in the words of a gentleman, by the name of , who has visited the spot.
“As you pass on the mail-road, from , Wayne county, to , Ontario county, New York, before arriving at the little village of , say from three to four, or about four miles from , you pass a large hill on the east side of the road. Why I say large, is because it is as large, perhaps, as any in that country.
“The north end rises quite suddenly until it assumes a level with the more southerly extremity; and I think, I may say, an elevation higher than at the south, a short distance, say half or three-fourths of a mile. As you pass towards , it lessens gradually, until the surface assumes its common level, or is broken by other smaller hills or ridges, water-courses and ravines. I think I am justified in saying, that this is the highest hill for some distance round, and I am certain, that its appearance, as it rises so suddenly from a plain on the north, must attract the notice of the traveller as he passes by.”—“The north end,” which has been described as rising suddenly from the plain, forms “a promontory without timber, but covered with grass. As you pass to the south, you soon come to scattering timber, the surface having been cleared by art or wind; and a short distance further left, you are surrounded with the common forest of the country. It is necessary to observe, that even the part cleared, was only occupied for pasturage; its steep ascent, and narrow summit not admitting the plough of the husbandman, with any degree of ease or profit. It was at the second mentioned place, where the record was found to be deposited, on the west side of the hill, not far from the top down its side; and when myself visited the place in the year 1830, there were several trees standing—enough to cause a shade in [p. 8]
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