Appendix: Orson Pratt, A[n] Interesting Account of Several Remarkable Visions, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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summer, but not so much as to prevent the surface being  covered with grass—which was also the case when the  record was first found.
“How far below the surface these records were” an ciently “placed, I am unable to say; but from the fact,  that they had been some fourteen hundred years buried,  and that, too, on the side of a hill so steep, one is ready to  conclude, that they were some feet below, as the earth  would naturally wear, more or less, in that length of time.  But they, being placed toward the top of the hill, the  ground would not remove as much as at two-thirds, per haps. Another circumstance would prevent a wearing of  the earth: in all probability, as soon as timber had time  to grow, the hill was covered,” “and the roots of the same  would hold the surface. However, on this point, I shall  leave every man to draw his own conclusion, and form his  own speculation.” But, suffice to say, “a hole of a sufficient  depth was dug. At the bottom of this was laid a stone of  suitable size, the upper surface being smooth. At each  edge, was placed a large quantity of cement, and into this  cement, at the four edges of this stone, were placed erect  four others; their bottom edges resting in the cement, at  the outer edges of the first stone. The four last named,  when placed erect, formed a box: the corners, or where  the edges of the four came in contact, were also cemented  so firmly, that the moisture from without was prevented  from entering. It is to be observed, also, that the inner  surfaces of the four erect or side stones, were smooth.  This box was sufficiently large to admit a breastplate,  such as was used by the ancients, to defend the chest, &c.,  from the arrows and weapons of their enemy. From the  bottom of the box, or from the breastplate, arose three small  pillars, composed of the same description of cement used on  the edges; and upon these three pillars were placed the  records.”—“This box, containing the records, was covered  with another stone, the bottom surface being flat, and the  upper crowning.” When it was first visited by Mr Smith,  on the morning of the 22d of September 1823, “a part of  the crowning stone was visible above the surface, while  the edges were concealed by the soil and grass.” From  which circumstance, it may be seen, “that however deep  this box might have been placed at first, the time had been [p. 9]
summer, but not so much as to prevent the surface being covered with grass—which was also the case when the record was first found.
“How far below the surface these records were” anciently “placed, I am unable to say; but from the fact, that they had been some fourteen hundred years buried, and that, too, on the side of a hill so steep, one is ready to conclude, that they were some feet below, as the earth would naturally wear, more or less, in that length of time. But they, being placed toward the top of the hill, the ground would not remove as much as at two-thirds, perhaps. Another circumstance would prevent a wearing of the earth: in all probability, as soon as timber had time to grow, the hill was covered,” “and the roots of the same would hold the surface. However, on this point, I shall leave every man to draw his own conclusion, and form his own speculation.” But, suffice to say, “a hole of a sufficient depth was dug. At the bottom of this was laid a stone of suitable size, the upper surface being smooth. At each edge, was placed a large quantity of cement, and into this cement, at the four edges of this stone, were placed erect four others; their bottom edges resting in the cement, at the outer edges of the first stone. The four last named, when placed erect, formed a box: the corners, or where the edges of the four came in contact, were also cemented so firmly, that the moisture from without was prevented from entering. It is to be observed, also, that the inner surfaces of the four erect or side stones, were smooth. This box was sufficiently large to admit a breastplate, such as was used by the ancients, to defend the chest, &c., from the arrows and weapons of their enemy. From the bottom of the box, or from the breastplate, arose three small pillars, composed of the same description of cement used on the edges; and upon these three pillars were placed the records.”—“This box, containing the records, was covered with another stone, the bottom surface being flat, and the upper crowning.” When it was first visited by Mr Smith, on the morning of the 22d of September 1823, “a part of the crowning stone was visible above the surface, while the edges were concealed by the soil and grass.” From which circumstance, it may be seen, “that however deep this box might have been placed at first, the time had been [p. 9]
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