Edward Partridge, History, Manuscript, circa 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [15]
image
indeed he <has> never has overcome <out grown> <fully recovered from> that beating The Governor <> was disposed  to bring the leaders of the mob<bers> to justice consequently <about 10 or 12> witnesses  <of the saints> were subpoened <to attend the Feb. term of the circuit court> and ’s co. <was> ordered to guard them  over to & back, <with his Co. of grays> the Atorney Genl. was also ordered to attend  the trial at the Feb. term of the circuit court court to assist the circuit  attorney. The witnesses were guarded over to and  after being there a short time they were visited by the circuit  attorney in co. with the atto[r] ney Genl. they informed the witnesses  that such was the excitement that it was doubtfull whether any  thing could be done to bring the mobbers to justice, that if any were  convicted they would only be fined some trifling sum not to exceed  $5 at most, and <they> advised them not to come before the grand jury <and intimated that the extent of the <there would be> danger> the  witnesses observed <replied> that they had been ordered there by the court and that they  supposed <that> that they were still subject to the court or <to them> the attorneys. as to the  danger of going before the grand jury <they feared it not —> they were ready & willing to go & testify to  the truth— they feared not [p. [15]]
indeed he has never fully recovered from that beating The Governor was disposed to bring the mobbers to justice consequently about 10 or 12 witnesses were subpoened to attend the Feb. term of the circuit court and ’s was ordered to guard them over to & back, with his Co. of grays the Atorney Genl. was also ordered to attend the court to assist the circuit attorney. The witnesses were guarded over to and after being there a short time they were visited by the circuit attorney in co. with the attor ney Genl. they informed the witnesses that such was the excitement that it was doubtfull whether any thing could be done to bring the mobbers to justice, that if any were convicted they would only be fined some trifling sum not to exceed $5 at most, and they advised them not to come before the grand jury and intimated that there would be danger the witnesses replied that they had been ordered there by the court and they supposed that they were still subject to the court or to them the attorneys. as to the danger of going before the grand jury they feared it not — they were ready & willing to go & testify to the truth— [p. [15]]
Page [15]