Edward Partridge, History, Manuscript, circa 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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The church <saints> did not like the idea of leaving the <And> few if any  believed <at first> that they should <would> have to leave <it> but that they would be  protected by thinking that government would protect them  in their Constitutional rights. A petition The mob par ty threatened the<m> saints <with destruction> if they made any effort to get any  assistance from any quarter but notwithstanding their threats  a petition was carefully got up circulated and obtained the  signature of <a> great many of the saints and was sent to the   of the before it became at all public. This  petition set forth <in> a concise <manner> history of the<ir> persecutions and solicited  the aid of the in obtaining their protecting them in  their rights that they might sue and obtain damages for loss  of property, abuse, defamation &.C.. The in his answer  expressed a willingness to help them but <could not untill they law could not be executed without force> had not the authority
He advised. us <them> to make complaint to the circuit Judge or the  justice of the peace <and obtain warrant, against for> of such as should threaten our <their> lives and  we <they> believed them in danger <to try the law both to against those who <should> threatend their lives and if the  law was resisted give  him official information of  the fact & he see that the law  was enforced.> * <*Put the warrants in the hands of the sheriff & if they could not be served then he the would enforce the law> Accordingly <about the 1st of Nov., when the mob raged again> application was made  to a Justice <of the peace> who had not then openly joined the mob, but he  refused <to give a warrant> saying that if he <did> granted <it> a warrant he feared that  his life would be in danger. They then sent 40 miles to the  circuit Judge and after considerable delay obtained a warrant  against a number of individuals. When the warrants arri ved it was to late to do any thing with them for the whole   was getting up in arms and the Saints had as  much as they could do to take care of themselves
He also advised them to sue for their damages. They accor dingly employed four counsellors at $250. <each> to commence  and carry their suits <more or less> through to final judgement— <They commenced by starting <with> 3 or 4 <or 5>— 2 of which were afterwards withdrawn>
Two or three suits were planted which were kept along for some  time when a change of Venue was obtained by <their> paying near  $300. before the time of final trial which was 2 or 3 years from the  commencement of the suits when it was expected that a trial  would be had their lawyers evidently turned against them  making <made a> a sort of compromise with the mob party discontinu ing a<n> principal <important suit> without obtaining any thing not even the paying <pay ment> of the costs <&> this was done without the knowledge or consent  of their client But employer and on the <an>other principal suit there <was something obtained>.  was <but> not enough <as much> obtained as had been paid the <for> lawyers <fees> & costs [p. [5]]
The saints did not like the idea of leaving the And few believed at first that they would have to leave it thinking that government would protect them in their Constitutional rights. The mob party threatened them with destruction if they made any effort to get assistance from any quarter but notwithstanding their threats a petition was carefully circulated and obtained the signature many of the saints and was sent to the of the before it became at all public. This petition set forth in a concise manner of their persecutions and solicited the aid of the in protecting them in their rights that they might sue and obtain damages for loss of property, abuse, defamation &.C.. The in his answer expressed a willingness to help them but could not untill the law could not be executed without force
He advised. them , for their to try the law against those who should threaten their lives and if the law was resisted give him official information of the fact & he see that the law was enforced. * *Put the warrants in the hands of the sheriff & if they could not be served then he the would enforce the law Accordingly about the 1st of Nov., when the mob raged again application was made to a Justice of the peace who had not then openly joined the mob, but he refused to give a warrant saying that if he did it he feared that his life would be in danger. They then sent 40 miles to the circuit Judge and after considerable delay obtained a warrant against a number of individuals. When the warrants arrived it was to late to do any thing with them for the whole was getting up in arms and the Saints had as much as they could do to take care of themselves
He also advised them to sue for their damages. They accordingly employed four counsellors at $250. each to commence and carry their suits more or less through to final judgement— They commenced with 4 or 5—
Two or three suits were planted which were kept along for some time when a change of Venue was obtained by their paying near $300. 2 or 3 years from the commencement of the suits when it was expected that a trial would be had their lawyers made a compromise with the mob party discontinuing an important suit without obtaining any thing not even the payment of the costs & this without the knowledge or consent of their employer on another suit there was something obtained. but not as much as had been paid for lawyers fees & costs [p. [5]]
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