Elders’ Journal, November 1837

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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haven and organized a small branch of  the church to the number of twelve, and  broke bread unto them. On the day  following we left the Islands, as was desirous to return to his  friends in . While on our way  to Portland we preached in the town of  Bath, to a large and respectable con gregation of citizens who met in Pier ces Hall: We were treated with ev ery mark of respect and civility, and  solicited to meet with them again. I  took the parting hand with  in South Berwick Me. And after  spending a season among the Saints  and friends in and Scarborough,  I left Portland on board the Bangor  (in company with Mrs. [Phebe Carter] Woodruff) for  the purpose of returning to the Islands  to spend the winter. Notwithstanding  we passed through a severe snow storm  by the way, we arrived at North Fox  Island safe and in good spirits, on the  31st Oct. and found the Saints strong  in the faith, and I think growing in  grace. I have as yet, mostly, confined  my labors since my return to North  and South Fox Islands. I have had  more calls for preaching than I can fill  I find a deep interest manifested in the  minds of many while investigating the  subject of the fullness of the gospel.  The people are more noble in Vinalha ven than in many places, they are gen erally willing to hear the matter before  they judge it. I have baptized a num ber since my return, and others have  offered themselves as candidates. The  church now numbers 17 in this town;  and I consider it as only the beginning  of the work of the Lord upon the Isl ands of the Sea. I would here re mark, that I have visited the Isle of  Holt since my return. The vessel in  which I sailed left the Island the day  following our arrival, consequently I  had but little time with the people. I  had the privilege of preaching the gos pel unto them and leaving the book of  Mormon. I have had an interview  with persons from several Islands  where we have not as yet proclaimed  the gospel, and some of the number  have manifested their faith in the cause,  by inviting me to visit them and offer ing to open their doors for preaching.  Thus doors are open not only upon  the maine land, but upon the Islands of  Sea for faithful laborers in the vine yard. The enemy of all righteousness  is busy in opposing the Saints, and stri ving to stop the progress of truth in  this country, as in all places where  truth is proclaimed, by creating and  setting afloat every falsehood and fool ish story that human ingenuity can in vent, or wicked men devise. The doc trines of the shakers, and and  others I might name with all the ap pendages of stories added unto them  that have long since been worn out  and found a grave, have of late appear ed upon these Islands of the Sea, as  though they had risen from the dead with  redoubled strength and are heaped up on the heads of the Latter Day Saints.  But notwithstanding this exertion a gainst the truth the work of God rolls  on and will continue to roll until his  Kingdom fills the whole earth. I need  the prayers of all the Saints as I am a lone and much is required at my  hands.
I wish to say a word concerning a  statement made by Mr. G. J. New ton, in his letter under date of Oct. 12,  1837, published in a Baptist paper at  Portland called Zion’s Advocate. In  speaking of the fruits of their seven  days meeting in the Baptist church on  North Fox Island, Mr. Newton (the  Pastor of the church,) made mention  of two converts that had been impress ed before this protracted meeting: one  of which he says was afterwards bap tized. It is a well known fact that  the two mentioned persons were his  own son and daughter. He then  speaks of several others who had re ceived the fellowship of the Church as  candidates for the ordinance of bap tism, Mr. Newton sums up the subject  by saying “It is worthy of remark  that those who have obtained a hope  are some of those who stood aloof from  hearing the “Mormons” (as he is pleas ed to call us.) Now what can Mr.  Newton think by presenting such a  “Sentiment” before the publick, for it  is a truth too notorious to be denied,  that not only his son and daughter, but  some, if not all of the other converts  of which he speaks as well as himself  attended our meetings from time to  time. The cloud of witnesses is to[o]  great on this subject to convince the  citizens of Vinalhaven that such a state ment is correct, and wherever else it  may find credit or be believed, it will  not be on North Fox Island. When ever men who profess to be teachers  of the people and ministers of the gos [p. 18]
haven and organized a small branch of the church to the number of twelve, and broke bread unto them. On the day following we left the Islands, as was desirous to return to his friends in . While on our way to Portland we preached in the town of Bath, to a large and respectable congregation of citizens who met in Pierces Hall: We were treated with every mark of respect and civility, and solicited to meet with them again. I took the parting hand with in South Berwick Me. And after spending a season among the Saints and friends in and Scarborough, I left Portland on board the Bangor (in company with Mrs. [Phebe Carter] Woodruff) for the purpose of returning to the Islands to spend the winter. Notwithstanding we passed through a severe snow storm by the way, we arrived at North Fox Island safe and in good spirits, on the 31st Oct. and found the Saints strong in the faith, and I think growing in grace. I have as yet, mostly, confined my labors since my return to North and South Fox Islands. I have had more calls for preaching than I can fill I find a deep interest manifested in the minds of many while investigating the subject of the fullness of the gospel. The people are more noble in Vinalhaven than in many places, they are generally willing to hear the matter before they judge it. I have baptized a number since my return, and others have offered themselves as candidates. The church now numbers 17 in this town; and I consider it as only the beginning of the work of the Lord upon the Islands of the Sea. I would here remark, that I have visited the Isle of Holt since my return. The vessel in which I sailed left the Island the day following our arrival, consequently I had but little time with the people. I had the privilege of preaching the gospel unto them and leaving the book of Mormon. I have had an interview with persons from several Islands where we have not as yet proclaimed the gospel, and some of the number have manifested their faith in the cause, by inviting me to visit them and offering to open their doors for preaching. Thus doors are open not only upon the maine land, but upon the Islands of Sea for faithful laborers in the vineyard. The enemy of all righteousness is busy in opposing the Saints, and striving to stop the progress of truth in this country, as in all places where truth is proclaimed, by creating and setting afloat every falsehood and foolish story that human ingenuity can invent, or wicked men devise. The doctrines of the shakers, and and others I might name with all the appendages of stories added unto them that have long since been worn out and found a grave, have of late appeared upon these Islands of the Sea, as though they had risen from the dead with redoubled strength and are heaped upon the heads of the Latter Day Saints. But notwithstanding this exertion against the truth the work of God rolls on and will continue to roll until his Kingdom fills the whole earth. I need the prayers of all the Saints as I am alone and much is required at my hands.
I wish to say a word concerning a statement made by Mr. G. J. Newton, in his letter under date of Oct. 12, 1837, published in a Baptist paper at Portland called Zion’s Advocate. In speaking of the fruits of their seven days meeting in the Baptist church on North Fox Island, Mr. Newton (the Pastor of the church,) made mention of two converts that had been impressed before this protracted meeting: one of which he says was afterwards baptized. It is a well known fact that the two mentioned persons were his own son and daughter. He then speaks of several others who had received the fellowship of the Church as candidates for the ordinance of baptism, Mr. Newton sums up the subject by saying “It is worthy of remark that those who have obtained a hope are some of those who stood aloof from hearing the “Mormons” (as he is pleased to call us.) Now what can Mr. Newton think by presenting such a “Sentiment” before the publick, for it is a truth too notorious to be denied, that not only his son and daughter, but some, if not all of the other converts of which he speaks as well as himself attended our meetings from time to time. The cloud of witnesses is too great on this subject to convince the citizens of Vinalhaven that such a statement is correct, and wherever else it may find credit or be believed, it will not be on North Fox Island. Whenever men who profess to be teachers of the people and ministers of the gos [p. 18]
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