Elders’ Journal, November 1837

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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nothing about the gathering for they  have no means to bring them to , let alone procuring them a place  to live after they get there. We all  pay 2 english shillings per week for  our lodging which is nearly 50 cents,  and then we buy our own provisions  at the market and it is cooked for us.—  The brethren will frequently divide the  last loaf with us, and will do all in their  power for us. If it had not been for  brother Goodson’s books, I know not  how we should have lived. They are  very kind to us where we are, but their  circumstances will not allow them to do  much for us without pay. I have fre quently seen the tender and delicate fe males with their old pails or baskets in  the streets gathering up fresh horse  dung with their naked hands, and then  go and sell it and get a penny or two’s  worth of bread for themselves and hun gary children. , how would  you like to follow that busines? I pray  God that such may not be your lot.—  Tell the brethren if it would be a pleas ure to them to see their wives carrying  on such or a similar branch of busi ness for a living, to bring them along  with them when they come to old Eng land to preach the gospel. Whoever  comes here for loaves and fishes will  realize their expectations as much as  our speculators.
If brother Joseph never advised cor rectly before, he certainly did when he  advised the brethren to leave their wo men at home. My humble advice is,  that if they have any compassion on  their wives, let them for God’s sake  and for their wive’s sake leave them at  home. It is of no use for any to come  into this country to preach the gospel  unless they are able to defend it like a  man of God. For unless they have a  pretty powerful gift, they cannot live.  Not so at home, if a preacher has but  a small gift there, he can get what he  wants to eat &c. because there are  none so distressedly poor there and  they will keep him over night free,  but this is not the custom in this coun try. The people expect pay for what  they do; and in fact, that people who  will receive the gospel, are not able to  do it without pay. Now if there are  any elders or preachers in the church  of Latter Day Saints in who  have faith to brook all these difficulties,  let them come to Old England. We  want them. We must have such men,  and we say to them “come over into  Macedonia and help us.” We do be lieve that affords some such  men, men who are willing to forsake  wife and children for Christ’s sake and  the gospel’s, and look forward for their  recompense at the resurrection of the  just. It would be altogether better for  the brethren to see us before they  commence their labors in this country,  for we can tell them many things re specting the customs of the people, and  the laws of the land respecting preach ing the gospel, that will be of great  service to them. I understand that   has gone East with his  wife to spend the winter, and meet  some other brethren in in May  next to come to England: But he had  better wait and see us in be fore he starts, or any one else; for we  can tell them things that will prove to  their advantage and to the advantage  of the cause if they will do so. We  shall probably sail for about  the first of March next, at least some  of us, if not all: And we hope to be in   about the first of May next.—  My dear , I never wanted to see  you more than I do at this time, yet I  am glad you are where you are, and  that I am where I am. But the time  will be when we shall meet again and  rejoice before the Lord. I can truly  say that I never before preached with  that power and Spirit that I have since  I come to this place. In fact, I am  surprized at myself many times. The  priests all fear and tremble and Babel’s  towers begin to fall. The priests talk ed of putting me in prison for preach ing without a liscence from under this  government. I made application to  the Clerk of the peace for a liscence,  but he informed that I could not obtain  one until the court of quarter sessions  which would be in October. I thought  it would not answer for me to be idle  until that time, therefore I continue  preaching in houses, and in the streets,  and on the public grounds, and in the  market places, and am liable to be ta ken & thrust into prison any day when  informed against: But the priests dare  not really do this for fear of the people,  for all men, almost, consider us to be  prophets of God. Thus by the power  and goodness of God we still continue  to preach Jesus Christ and him cruci fied. We are now occupying a large  and spacious building in town owned [p. 20]
nothing about the gathering for they have no means to bring them to , let alone procuring them a place to live after they get there. We all pay 2 english shillings per week for our lodging which is nearly 50 cents, and then we buy our own provisions at the market and it is cooked for us.— The brethren will frequently divide the last loaf with us, and will do all in their power for us. If it had not been for brother Goodson’s books, I know not how we should have lived. They are very kind to us where we are, but their circumstances will not allow them to do much for us without pay. I have frequently seen the tender and delicate females with their old pails or baskets in the streets gathering up fresh horse dung with their naked hands, and then go and sell it and get a penny or two’s worth of bread for themselves and hungary children. , how would you like to follow that busines? I pray God that such may not be your lot.— Tell the brethren if it would be a pleasure to them to see their wives carrying on such or a similar branch of business for a living, to bring them along with them when they come to old England to preach the gospel. Whoever comes here for loaves and fishes will realize their expectations as much as our speculators.
If brother Joseph never advised correctly before, he certainly did when he advised the brethren to leave their women at home. My humble advice is, that if they have any compassion on their wives, let them for God’s sake and for their wive’s sake leave them at home. It is of no use for any to come into this country to preach the gospel unless they are able to defend it like a man of God. For unless they have a pretty powerful gift, they cannot live. Not so at home, if a preacher has but a small gift there, he can get what he wants to eat &c. because there are none so distressedly poor there and they will keep him over night free, but this is not the custom in this country. The people expect pay for what they do; and in fact, that people who will receive the gospel, are not able to do it without pay. Now if there are any elders or preachers in the church of Latter Day Saints in who have faith to brook all these difficulties, let them come to Old England. We want them. We must have such men, and we say to them “come over into Macedonia and help us.” We do believe that affords some such men, men who are willing to forsake wife and children for Christ’s sake and the gospel’s, and look forward for their recompense at the resurrection of the just. It would be altogether better for the brethren to see us before they commence their labors in this country, for we can tell them many things respecting the customs of the people, and the laws of the land respecting preaching the gospel, that will be of great service to them. I understand that has gone East with his wife to spend the winter, and meet some other brethren in in May next to come to England: But he had better wait and see us in before he starts, or any one else; for we can tell them things that will prove to their advantage and to the advantage of the cause if they will do so. We shall probably sail for about the first of March next, at least some of us, if not all: And we hope to be in about the first of May next.— My dear , I never wanted to see you more than I do at this time, yet I am glad you are where you are, and that I am where I am. But the time will be when we shall meet again and rejoice before the Lord. I can truly say that I never before preached with that power and Spirit that I have since I come to this place. In fact, I am surprized at myself many times. The priests all fear and tremble and Babel’s towers begin to fall. The priests talked of putting me in prison for preaching without a liscence from under this government. I made application to the Clerk of the peace for a liscence, but he informed that I could not obtain one until the court of quarter sessions which would be in October. I thought it would not answer for me to be idle until that time, therefore I continue preaching in houses, and in the streets, and on the public grounds, and in the market places, and am liable to be taken & thrust into prison any day when informed against: But the priests dare not really do this for fear of the people, for all men, almost, consider us to be prophets of God. Thus by the power and goodness of God we still continue to preach Jesus Christ and him crucified. We are now occupying a large and spacious building in town owned [p. 20]
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