“Extract, from the Private Journal of Joseph Smith Jr.,” July 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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We had now, no hopes whatever, of  successfully resisting the mob, who  kept constantly increasing: our pro visions were entirely exhausted and  we being wearied out, by continu ally standing on guard, and watching  the movements of our enemies; who,  during the time I was there, fired at us  a great many times. Some of the  brethren died, for want of the com mon necessaries of life, and perished  from starvation; and for once in my  life, I had the pain of beholding some  of my fellow creatures fall victims to  the spirit of persecution, which did  then, and has since prevailed to such  an extent in Upper —men too,  who were virtuous, and against whom,  no legal process could for one moment,  be sustained; but who, in consequence  of their love to God—attachment to his  cause—and their determination to keep  the faith, were thus brought to an un timely grave.
Many houses, belonging to my  brethren, were burned; their cattle d[r]iv en away, and a great quantity of their  property destroyed by the mob. See ing no prospect of relief, the having turned a deaf ear to our  entreaties, the militia having mutinied,  and the greater part of them ready to  join the mob; the brethren came to the  conclusion to leave that place, and  seek a shelter elsewhere; they conse quently took their departure, with a bout seventy waggons, with the rem nant of the property they had been able  to save from their matchless foes,  and proceeded to . During  our journey, we were continually har rassed and threatened by the mob, who  shot at us several times; whilst sever al of our brethren died from the fatigue  and privations which they had to en dure, and we had to inter them by the  wayside, without a coffin, and under  circumstances the most distressing.
On my arrival in I was in formed by of , that a company of mobbers  eight hundred strong, were marching  towards a settlement of our people’s in  . He ordered out one  of the officers to raise a force and  march immediately to what he called  ’s town and defend our people  from the attacks of the mob, until he  should raise the militia in his, and the  adjoining counties to put them down.  A small company of militia who were  on their rout to , and  who had passed through , he  ordered back again, stating that they  were not to be depended upon, as many  of them were disposed to join the mob;  and to use his own expression, were  “damned rotten hearted.” According  to orders march ed with a number of our people to to afford what assistance  they could to their brethren. Having  some property in that and hav ing a house building there, I went up at  the same time. While I was there a  number of houses belonging to our peo ple were burned by the mob, who com mitted many other depredations, such  as driving off horses, sheep, cattle, hogs  &c. A number, whose houses were  burned down as well as those who lived  in scattered and lonely situations, fled  into the town for safety, and for shelter  from the inclemency of the weather, as  a considerable snow storm had taken  place just about that time; women and  children, some in the most delicate sit uations were thus obliged to leave their  homes, and travel several miles in or der to effect their escape. My feelings  were such as I cannot describe when  I saw them flock into the village, al most entirely destitu[t]e of clothes, and  only escaping with their lives. During  this state of affairs ar rived at , and was at the  house of Colonel , when  the intelligence was brought, that the  mob were burning houses; and also  when women and children were fleeing  for safety. who held a  commission in the 59th regiment under  his () command, asked  what was to be done. He told him  that he must immediately, call out his  men and go and put them down. Ac cordingly, a force was immediately rais ed for the purpose of quelling the mob,  and in a short time were on their  march with a determination to drive the  mob, or die in the attempt; as they  could bear such treatment no longer.  The mob having learned the orders of  , and likewise being  aware of the determination of the op pressed, they broke up their encamp ments and fled. The mob seeing that  they could not succeed by force, now [p. 4]
We had now, no hopes whatever, of successfully resisting the mob, who kept constantly increasing: our provisions were entirely exhausted and we being wearied out, by continually standing on guard, and watching the movements of our enemies; who, during the time I was there, fired at us a great many times. Some of the brethren died, for want of the common necessaries of life, and perished from starvation; and for once in my life, I had the pain of beholding some of my fellow creatures fall victims to the spirit of persecution, which did then, and has since prevailed to such an extent in Upper —men too, who were virtuous, and against whom, no legal process could for one moment, be sustained; but who, in consequence of their love to God—attachment to his cause—and their determination to keep the faith, were thus brought to an untimely grave.
Many houses, belonging to my brethren, were burned; their cattle driven away, and a great quantity of their property destroyed by the mob. Seeing no prospect of relief, the having turned a deaf ear to our entreaties, the militia having mutinied, and the greater part of them ready to join the mob; the brethren came to the conclusion to leave that place, and seek a shelter elsewhere; they consequently took their departure, with about seventy waggons, with the remnant of the property they had been able to save from their matchless foes, and proceeded to . During our journey, we were continually harrassed and threatened by the mob, who shot at us several times; whilst several of our brethren died from the fatigue and privations which they had to endure, and we had to inter them by the wayside, without a coffin, and under circumstances the most distressing.
On my arrival in I was informed by of , that a company of mobbers eight hundred strong, were marching towards a settlement of our people’s in . He ordered out one of the officers to raise a force and march immediately to what he called ’s town and defend our people from the attacks of the mob, until he should raise the militia in his, and the adjoining counties to put them down. A small company of militia who were on their rout to , and who had passed through , he ordered back again, stating that they were not to be depended upon, as many of them were disposed to join the mob; and to use his own expression, were “damned rotten hearted.” According to orders marched with a number of our people to to afford what assistance they could to their brethren. Having some property in that and having a house building there, I went up at the same time. While I was there a number of houses belonging to our people were burned by the mob, who committed many other depredations, such as driving off horses, sheep, cattle, hogs &c. A number, whose houses were burned down as well as those who lived in scattered and lonely situations, fled into the town for safety, and for shelter from the inclemency of the weather, as a considerable snow storm had taken place just about that time; women and children, some in the most delicate situations were thus obliged to leave their homes, and travel several miles in order to effect their escape. My feelings were such as I cannot describe when I saw them flock into the village, almost entirely destitute of clothes, and only escaping with their lives. During this state of affairs arrived at , and was at the house of Colonel , when the intelligence was brought, that the mob were burning houses; and also when women and children were fleeing for safety. who held a commission in the 59th regiment under his () command, asked what was to be done. He told him that he must immediately, call out his men and go and put them down. Accordingly, a force was immediately raised for the purpose of quelling the mob, and in a short time were on their march with a determination to drive the mob, or die in the attempt; as they could bear such treatment no longer. The mob having learned the orders of , and likewise being aware of the determination of the oppressed, they broke up their encampments and fled. The mob seeing that they could not succeed by force, now [p. 4]
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