History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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a prophet of the Lord. In this I do not pretend that he  is not a man subject to passions like other men, beset  with infirmities and encompassed with weaknesses; but  if he is, all men were so before him, and a pretence  to the contrary would argue a more than mortal, wh ich would at once destroy the whole system of the  religion of the Lord Jesus; for he anciently chose the  weak things to overcome the strong, the foolish to conf ound the wise, (I mean considered so by this world,)  and by the foolishness of preaching to save those  who believe.
On the private character of our brother I need  add nothing further, at present, previous to his obta ining the records of the Nephites, only that while in  that country, some verry officious persons complained  of him as a disorderly person, and brought him  before the authorities of the country county; but there bei ng no cause of action he was honorably acquited.  From this time forward he continued to receive  instructions concerning the coming forth of the  fulness of the gospel, from the mouth of the hea venly messenger, until he was directed to visit aga in the place where the records was deposited.
For the present I close, with a thankful heart that  I am permitted to see thousands rejoicing in the assur ance of the promises of the Lord, confirmed unto them  through the obediance of the everlasting covenant.
As ever your brother in the Lord Jesus
To .

Editorial Note
It is unclear why began transcribing the following letter into JS’s history. He transcribed fewer than three paragraphs before canceling the entry. The letter, copied from the November 1835 issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, was the second in a series of three letters in which JS provided instruction for traveling elders. After copying the first few paragraphs of the published letter, Parrish discontinued the task and wrote “Error” across the text three times. Parrish’s transcription was made after the November issue was published and apparently before early April 1836, when Warren Parrish probably transferred custody of the 1834–1836 history to along with JS’s journal.

JS, “To the Elders of the Church,” November 1835

To the Elders of the Church of the  Latter Day Saints
At the close of my letter in the Septem ber No. of the “Messenger and Advocate,” I promise to  continue the subject there commenced: I do so with  a hope that it may be a benefit and a mea ns of assistance to the elders in their labours, while [p. 103]
a prophet of the Lord. In this I do not pretend that he is not a man subject to passions like other men, beset with infirmities and encompassed with weaknesses; but if he is, all men were so before him, and a pretence to the contrary would argue a more than mortal, which would at once destroy the whole system of the religion of the Lord Jesus; for he anciently chose the weak to overcome the strong, the foolish to confound the wise, (I mean considered so by this world,) and by the foolishness of preaching to save those who believe.
On the private character of our brother I need add nothing further, at present, previous to his obtaining the records of the Nephites, only that while in that country, some verry officious persons complained of him as a disorderly person, and brought him before the authorities of the county; but there being no cause of action he was honorably acquited. From this time forward he continued to receive instructions concerning the coming forth of the fulness of the gospel, from the mouth of the heavenly messenger, until he was directed to visit again the place where the records was deposited.
For the present I close, with a thankful heart that I am permitted to see thousands rejoicing in the assurance of the promises of the Lord, confirmed unto them through the obediance of the everlasting covenant.
As ever your brother in the Lord Jesus
To .

Editorial Note
It is unclear why began transcribing the following letter into JS’s history. He transcribed fewer than three paragraphs before canceling the entry. The letter, copied from the November 1835 issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, was the second in a series of three letters in which JS provided instruction for traveling elders. After copying the first few paragraphs of the published letter, Parrish discontinued the task and wrote “Error” across the text three times. Parrish’s transcription was made after the November issue was published and apparently before early April 1836, when Warren Parrish probably transferred custody of the 1834–1836 history to along with JS’s journal.

JS, “To the Elders of the Church,” November 1835

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