History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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an equal chance with him. This was truly an insult. It  was indirectly accusing him of wilful stubbornness and wick ed obstinacy: however he did not reply to him in a harsh  manner, knowing his ’s irascible disposition, but tried  to reason with him and show him the propriety of a compliance  with his request. He finally succeeded with the assistance of  his brother , in obtaining his assent to the proposition.  he had made. He, (Joseph) then related the circumstances as they  occurred, and wherein he had done wrong he confessed it and asked  him to forgive him. then made his statements justifying  himself, wholly not only in transgressing the rules of the council,  but in treating the Presidency with utter contempt. After he  had closed, began to make some remarks in the  spirit of meekness. became enraged, Joseph now joined his br.   in trying to calm the stormy feelings of But, neither  neither reason nor argument were of any avail. He insisted that they  intended to add abuse to injury. His passion increased; he arose  abruptly and said he wanted no more to to do with them or the church  and they might take his license for he would have nothing to do with  them. He rushed out of the door in a fit of rage, his brothers trying  to prevail on him to stop, but all their entreaties had no effect  to soften his heart or subdue his passion. He went away in a rage  and soon sent his license to his brother Joseph. He appeared to be  under the influence of the Adversary of righteousness, and consequently,  to spread the leaven of iniquity among the brethren of the Church.  He succeeded in prejudiced prejudicing the mind of his brother . He  was also soon heard in the highway exclaiming against his br.  Joseph; which would make his enemies to greatly rejoice.  Where the matter would end he knew not, but he prayed God to forgive  them, and give them humility and unfeigned repentance. The feelings  of his heart he could not express. on that occasion. He could pre vail nothing with them; he could only pray his Heavenly Father  to open their eyes that they may discover where they stand, and  extricate themselves from the snare into which they had fallen.
After dinner he in company with his , children and brother   and some others rode out on a visit to s  who lived near the village of in Cayahoga [Cuyahoga] County. He  expressed himself as having had an agreeable visit, and as soon as he  returned, he was called upon to baptize. Mr. Samuel Whitney, wife  and daughter. After baptizm, he with others returned to their [p. 115]
an equal chance with him. This was truly an insult. It was indirectly accusing him of wilful stubbornness and wicked obstinacy: however he did not reply to him in a harsh manner, knowing his ’s irascible disposition, but tried to reason with him and show him the propriety of a compliance with his request. He finally succeeded with the assistance of his brother , in obtaining his assent to the proposition. he had made. He, (Joseph) then related the circumstances as they occurred, and wherein he had done wrong he confessed it and asked him to forgive him. then made his statements justifying himself, wholly not only in transgressing the rules of the council, but in treating the Presidency with utter contempt. After he had closed, began to make some remarks in the spirit of meekness. became enraged, Joseph now joined his br. in trying to calm the stormy feelings of But, neither neither reason nor argument were of any avail. He insisted that they intended to add abuse to injury. His passion increased; he arose abruptly and said he wanted no more to to do with them or the church and they might take his license for he would have nothing to do with them. He rushed out of the door in a fit of rage, his brothers trying to prevail on him to stop, but all their entreaties had no effect to soften his heart or subdue his passion. He went away in a rage and soon sent his license to his brother Joseph. He appeared to be under the influence of the Adversary of righteousness, and consequently, to spread the leaven of iniquity among the brethren of the Church. He succeeded in prejudicing the mind of his brother . He was also soon heard in the highway exclaiming against his br. Joseph; which would make his enemies to greatly rejoice. Where the matter would end he knew not, but he prayed God to forgive them, and give them humility and unfeigned repentance. The feelings of his heart he could not express. on that occasion. He could prevail nothing with them; he could only pray his Heavenly Father to open their eyes that they may discover where they stand, and extricate themselves from the snare into which they had fallen.
After dinner he in company with his , children and brother and some others rode out on a visit to s who lived near the village of in Cayahoga [Cuyahoga] County. He expressed himself as having had an agreeable visit, and as soon as he returned, he was called upon to baptize. Mr. Samuel Whitney, wife and daughter. After baptizm, he with others returned to their [p. 115]
Page 115