History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Eldr. called and read the foregoing letter himself and Pres. Smith explained upon the objections named in it, and satisfied his mind upon every objectionable point, and remarked after they had got through, that he was more than satisfied, with his explannations, and would attend the Hebrew School, and on parting gave him his hand, with every expression of friendship that a gentleman and a christian could manifest; which our author reciprocated with cheerfulness, declareing at the same time, that he entertained the best of feelings for him, and most cordially forgave him the ingratitude, which was manifested in his letter, knowing that it was for want of correct information, that his mind was disturbed as far as his reflections related to me Joseph. But the committee had not dealt, in righteousness with him in all things; but all is now amicably adjusted and setled, and no hardness exists between us them.
This evening his & called to see him upon the subject of the difficulty that transpired at their house on wednesday evening, between him and his brother . They were sorely afflicted in mind, and almost heart broken on the account of that occurrence. The subject of our narative conversed with his parents and convinced them that he was not to <be> blame[d] for taking the course he did with his brother on that occassion. But that he had acted in righteousness with him in all things.
He invited his parents to come and live with him, which they concented to do, as soon as it is practicable.
18 December 1835 • Friday
Friday morning 18th. He was at home; his brother called to see him, and read a letter that he received from , in which he asked his (’s) forgiveness for the abuse he offered him at the debate. He tarried most of the fore noon and conversed freely with Joseph upon the subject of the difficulty existing between him [p. 154]
Eldr. called and read the foregoing letter himself and Pres. Smith explained upon the objections named in it, and satisfied his mind upon every objectionable point, and remarked after they had got through, that he was more than satisfied, with his explannations, and would attend the Hebrew School, and on parting gave him his hand, with every expression of friendship that a gentleman and a christian could manifest; which our author reciprocated with cheerfulness, declareing at the same time, that he entertained the best of feelings for him, and most cordially forgave him the ingratitude, which was manifested in his letter, knowing that it was for want of correct information, that his mind was disturbed as far as his reflections related to Joseph. But the committee had not dealt, in righteousness with him in all things; but all is now amicably adjusted and setled, and no hardness exists between them.
This evening his & called to see him upon the subject of the difficulty that transpired at their house on wednesday evening, between him and his brother . They were sorely afflicted in mind, and almost heart broken on the account of that occurrence. The subject of our narative conversed with his parents and convinced them that he was not to be blamed for taking the course he did with his brother on that occassion. But that he had acted in righteousness with him in all things.
He invited his parents to come and live with him, which they concented to do, as soon as it is practicable.
18 December 1835 • Friday
Friday morning 18th. He was at home; his brother called to see him, and read a letter that he received from , in which he asked his (’s) forgiveness for the abuse he offered him at the debate. He tarried most of the fore noon and conversed freely with Joseph upon the subject of the difficulty existing between him [p. 154]
Page 154