History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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he preached to a crowded audiance, who listened  with attention while he delivered a lecture of about  3, hours in length; he had great liberty in speaking.
We were afterwards informed that there were, some  persons present, who are of the calvinistic faith; if so  we have no doubt but some of our authors sayings  set to them like a garment that, was well fited, as he  exposed their craft, and abominations, to a nicety, and  that too, in the language of the scriptures. And his prayer  to God is that it may be like a nail in a sure  place, driven by the Master of assemblies.
To day Col. Chamberlain’s Son called to see him,  a respectable gentleman.

30 December 1835 • Wednesday

Wednesday 30th. He spent the day in reading hebrew  at the council room, with his , in whose comp any he delighted, & who had sufficiently recovered  his health, to attend to his usual avocation.

31 December 1835 • Thursday

Thursday 31st. After attending to his domestic con cerns, he retired to the council room, in the post office  , in order to persue his studies.
The council of the twelve convened in an  upper room under the same roof, and sent  for him and some of the rest, of the <first> presidency  to meet with them, to take into consideration the sub ject of the council, that is to be holden on Saturday  next, and to make some arangments respecting  it.— In the afternoon he attended at the to give some directions concerning, the  finishing of the upper rooms, and more especially  the west room which he intends occupying for  a translating room which will be prepared this  week.

1 January 1836 • Friday

Friday morning January 1st. 1836.— On the introduction  of the newyear, his heart is filled with greatful praise  to God, for his kind care that has been over him and  his family in preserving their lives while another year  has rolled away. They have been sustained and up held in the midst of a wicked, and pervers generation  and exposed to all the afflictions temptations and  miseries that are incident to human life; for which [p. 166]
he preached to a crowded audiance, who listened with attention while he delivered a lecture of about 3, hours in length; he had great liberty in speaking.
We were afterwards informed that there were, some persons present, who are of the calvinistic faith; if so we have no doubt but some of our authors sayings set to them like a garment that, was well fited, as he exposed their craft, and abominations, to a nicety, and that too, in the language of the scriptures. And his prayer to God is that it may be like a nail in a sure place, driven by the Master of assemblies.
To day Col. Chamberlain’s Son called to see him, a respectable gentleman.

30 December 1835 • Wednesday

Wednesday 30th. He spent the day in reading hebrew at the council room, with his , in whose company he delighted, & who had sufficiently recovered his health, to attend to his usual avocation.

31 December 1835 • Thursday

Thursday 31st. After attending to his domestic concerns, he retired to the council room, in the , in order to persue his studies.
The council of the twelve convened in an upper room under the same roof, and sent for him and some of the rest, of the first presidency to meet with them, to take into consideration the subject of the council, that is to be holden on Saturday next, and to make some arangments respecting it.— In the afternoon he attended at the to give some directions concerning, the finishing of the upper rooms, and more especially the west room which he intends occupying for a translating room which will be prepared this week.

1 January 1836 • Friday

Friday morning January 1st. 1836.— On the introduction of the newyear, his heart is filled with greatful praise to God, for his kind care that has been over him and his family in preserving their lives while another year has rolled away. They have been sustained and upheld in the midst of a wicked, and pervers generation and exposed to all the afflictions temptations and miseries that are incident to human life; for which [p. 166]
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