History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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the world, and of his walk and outward appearance, but do not understand me  as attempting to place him on a level with men, or his mission or [on] a paral lel with those of the prophets and apostles—far from this. I view his mission  such as none other could fill; that he was offered without spot to God a pro pitiation for our sins; that he rose triumphant and victorious over the  grave, and him that has <the> power of death.—
This man could not do— It required a perfect sacrafice—man is im perfect— It required a spotless offering—man is not spotless— It required  an infinite atonement—man is mortal!
I have, then as you will see, made mention of our Lord, to show that  individuals teaching truth, whether perfect or imperfect have been looked  upon as the worst of men. and that even our Saviour, the great Shepherd  of Israel was mocked and derided, and placed on a parallel with  the prince of devils; and the prophets and apostles, though at  this day, looked upon as perfect as perfection, were concidered  the basest of the human family by those among whom they  lived. It is not rumor, though it is wafted by every gale, and  retriated [reiterated] by every zephyr, upon which we are to found our judgm ents of ones merits or demerits: If it is we erect an altar upon  which we sacrafice the most perfect of men, and establish a  criterion by which the “vilest of the vile” may escape censure.
But lest I weary you with too many remarks upon the  history of the past, after a few upon the propriety of a narative  of the description I have proposed, I shall proceed.—Editor.
 
Oliver Cowdery, “Letter III,” December 1834
Letter III.
To Esqr.
Dear Brother:—
after a silence of another  month, agreeabley to my my promise I proceed upon the subject  I proposed in the first No. of the Advocate. Perhaps an apology  for brevity may not be improper, here, as many important  incidents consequently transpiring in the organization and establishment <estab lishing> of a society like the one whose history I am about to  give to the world, are overlooked or lost, and soon buried with those  who were the actors, will prevent my giving those minute and  particular reflections which I have so often wished migh[t] have  characterized the “Acts of the apostles,” and the ancient Saints.
But such facts as are within my knowledge, will be given  without any reference to inconsistencies, in the minds of others [p. 57]
the world, and of his walk and outward appearance, but do not understand me as attempting to place him on a level with men, or his mission or [on] a parallel with those of the prophets and apostles—far from this. I view his mission such as none other could fill; that he was offered without spot to God a propitiation for our sins; that he rose triumphant and victorious over the grave, and him that has the power of death.—
This man could not do— It required a perfect sacrafice—man is imperfect— It required a spotless offering—man is not spotless— It required an infinite atonement—man is mortal!
I have, then as you will see, made mention of our Lord, to show that individuals teaching truth, whether perfect or imperfect have been looked upon as the worst of men. and that even our Saviour, the great Shepherd of Israel was mocked and derided, and placed on a parallel with the prince of devils; and the prophets and apostles, though at this day, looked upon as perfect as perfection, were concidered the basest of the human family by those among whom they lived. It is not rumor, though it is wafted by every gale, and retriated reiterated by every zephyr, upon which we are to found our judgments of ones merits or demerits: If it is we erect an altar upon which we sacrafice the most perfect of men, and establish a criterion by which the “vilest of the vile” may escape censure.
But lest I weary you with too many remarks upon the history of the past, after a few upon the propriety of a narative of the description I have proposed, I shall proceed.—Editor.
 
Oliver Cowdery, “Letter III,” December 1834
Letter III.
To Esqr.
Dear Brother:—
after a silence of another month, agreeabley to my my promise I proceed upon the subject I proposed in the first No. of the Advocate. Perhaps an apology for brevity may not be improper, here, as many important incidents consequently transpiring in the organization and establishing of a society like the one whose history I am about to give to the world, are overlooked or lost, and soon buried with those who were the actors, will prevent my giving those minute and particular reflections which I have so often wished might have characterized the “Acts of the apostles,” and the ancient Saints.
But such facts as are within my knowledge, will be given without any reference to inconsistencies, in the minds of others [p. 57]
Page 57