History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 58
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or impossibilities, in the feelings of such as do not give credence to the syst em of salvation and redemption so clearly set forth and so plainly  written over the face of the sacred scriptures:
Upon the propriety, then, of a narative of this kind, I have briefly to  remark: It is known to you, that this church has suffered reproach  and persecution, from a majority of mankind who have heard but  a rumor, since its first organization. and further, you are also conversant  with the fact, that no sooner had the messengers of the fulness of the gospel  began to proclaim its heavenly precepts, and call upon men to  embrace the same, than they were vilified and slandered by  thousands who never saw their faces, and much less knew  aught derogatory of their characters, moral or religious— upon this unfair and unsaint like manner of procedure they have  been giving in large sheets their own opinions of the incorrect ness of our system, and attested volum[e]s of our lives and characters.  Since, then, our opposers have been thus kind to introduce our  cause before the public, it is no more than just that a correct  account should be given; and since they have invariably sought  to cast a shade over the truth, and hinder its influence  from gaining ascindency, it is also, proper that it should be  vindicated, by laying before the world a correct statement of  of events as they have transpired from time to time.
Whether I shall succeed so far in my purpose as to convince the  publick of the incorrectness of those scurulous reports which have  inundated our land, or even but a small portion of them, will  be better ascertained when I close than when I commence;  and I am content to submit it before the candid for perusal,  & before the Judge of all for inspection, as I most assuredly believe  that before Him I must stand and answer for the deeds trans acted in this life.
Should I, however, be instrumental in causing a few to hear  before they judge, and understand both sides of this matter before  they condemn, I shall have the satisfaction of seeing them embr ace it as I am certain that one is the inevitable fruit of the other.
But to proceede:
You will recollect that I informed you, in my letter pub lished in the first No. of the Messenger and Advocate, that this  history would necessarily embrace the life and character of  our esteemed friend and brother, J. Smith jr. one of the presid ents of this church, and for information on that part of the [p. 58]
or impossibilities, in the feelings of such as do not give credence to the system of salvation and redemption so clearly set forth and so plainly written over the face of the sacred scriptures:
Upon the propriety, then, of a narative of this kind, I have briefly to remark: It is known to you, that this church has suffered reproach and persecution, from a majority of mankind who have heard but a rumor, since its first organization. and further, you are also conversant with the fact, that no sooner had the messengers of the fulness of the gospel began to proclaim its heavenly precepts, and call upon men to embrace the same, than they were vilified and slandered by thousands who never saw their faces, and much less knew aught derogatory of their characters, moral or religious—upon this unfair and unsaint like manner of procedure they have been giving in large sheets their own opinions of the incorrectness of our system, and attested volumes of our lives and characters. Since, then, our opposers have been thus kind to introduce our cause before the public, it is no more than just that a correct account should be given; and since they have invariably sought to cast a shade over the truth, and hinder its influence from gaining ascindency, it is also, proper that it should be vindicated, by laying before the world a correct statement of of events as they have transpired from time to time.
Whether I shall succeed so far in my purpose as to convince the publick of the incorrectness of those scurulous reports which have inundated our land, or even but a small portion of them, will be better ascertained when I close than when I commence; and I am content to submit it before the candid for perusal, & before the Judge of all for inspection, as I most assuredly believe that before Him I must stand and answer for the deeds transacted in this life.
Should I, however, be instrumental in causing a few to hear before they judge, and understand both sides of this matter before they condemn, I shall have the satisfaction of seeing them embrace it as I am certain that one is the inevitable fruit of the other.
But to proceede:
You will recollect that I informed you, in my letter published in the first No. of the Messenger and Advocate, that this history would necessarily embrace the life and character of our esteemed friend and brother, J. Smith jr. one of the presidents of this church, and for information on that part of the [p. 58]
Page 58