History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 89
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animated their clay had fled, each lifeless lump lay on one common level—cold and inanimate. Those bosoms which had burned with rage against each other for real or suposed injury, had now ceased to heave with malice; those arms which were, a few moments before nerved with strength, had alike become paralized and those hearts which had been fired with revenge, had now ceased to beat, and the head to think—in silence, in solitude, and in disgrace alike, they have long since turned to earth, to their mother dust, to await the august, and to millions, awful hour, when the trump of the Son of God shall echo and reecho from the skies, and they come forth, quickened and immortalized, to not only stand in each other’s presence, but before the bar of him who is Eternal!
with sentiments of pure respect, I conclude by subscribing myself, your brother in the gospel,
.
 
Oliver Cowdery, “Letter VIII,” October 1835
Letter VIII.
Dear ,—
In my last I said I should give, partially, a “description of the place where, and the manner in which these records were deposited:” the first promise I have fulfilled, and must proceed to the latter:
The hill of which I have been speaking, at the time mentioned, presented a varied appearance: the north end rose suddenly from the plain, forming a promontory without timber, but covered with grass. As you passed to the south you soon came to scattering timber, the surface having been cleared by art or by wind; and a short distance further left, you are surrounded with the common forest of the country. It is necessary to observe, that even the part cleared was only occupied for pasturage, its steep ascent and narrow summit not admitting the plow of the husbandman, with any degree of [p. 89]
animated their clay had fled, each lifeless lump lay on one common level—cold and inanimate. Those bosoms which had burned with rage against each other for real or suposed injury, had now ceased to heave with malice; those arms which were, a few moments before nerved with strength, had alike become paralized and those hearts which had been fired with revenge, had now ceased to beat, and the head to think—in silence, in solitude, and in disgrace alike, they have long since turned to earth, to their mother dust, to await the august, and to millions, awful hour, when the trump of the Son of God shall echo and reecho from the skies, and they come forth, quickened and immortalized, to not only stand in each other’s presence, but before the bar of him who is Eternal!
with sentiments of pure respect, I conclude by subscribing myself, your brother in the gospel,
.
 
Oliver Cowdery, “Letter VIII,” October 1835
Letter VIII.
Dear ,—
In my last I said I should give, partially, a “description of the place where, and the manner in which these records were deposited:” the first promise I have fulfilled, and must proceed to the latter:
The hill of which I have been speaking, at the time mentioned, presented a varied appearance: the north end rose suddenly from the plain, forming a promontory without timber, but covered with grass. As you passed to the south you soon came to scattering timber, the surface having been cleared by art or by wind; and a short distance further left, you are surrounded with the common forest of the country. It is necessary to observe, that even the part cleared was only occupied for pasturage, its steep ascent and narrow summit not admitting the plow of the husbandman, with any degree of [p. 89]
Page 89