History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 331
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chairman of the said committee, submitted for the consideration  of the meeting, the following;
Address, &c “This meeting, professing to act not from the  impulse <excitement> of the moment, but under a deep and abiding convic tion that the occasion is one that calls for cool deliberation, as  well as energetic action, deem it proper to lay before the public  an expose of our peculiar situation, in regard to this singu lar sect of pretended christians, and a solemn declaration  of our unalterable determination <to> amend it.
The evil is one that no one could have foreseen, and  is therefore unprovided for by the laws, and the delays in cident to legislation, would put the mischief beyond remedy.
But little more than two years ago, some two or three  of these people made their appearance on the upper , and they now number some twelve hundred souls  in the ; and each successive autumn and spring  pours forth its swarms among us, with a gradual falling  of the character of those who compose them; until it seems  that those communities from which they come, were flood ing us with the very dregs of their composition. Elevated  as they mostly are, but little above the condition of our  blacks, either in regard to property or education, they have  become a subject of much anxiety on that part, serious  and well grounded complaints having been already made  of their corrupting influence on our slaves.
We are daily told, and not by the ignorant alone, but  by all classes of them, that we, (the ,) of this  are to be cut off, and our lands appropriated by them for  . Whether this is to be accomplished by the  hand of the destroying angel, the judgments of God, or  the arm of power, they are not fully agreed among themselves.
Some recent remarks in the “Evening and Morning  Star,” their organ in this place, by their tendency to mod erate such hopes and repress such desires, shew plain ly that many of this deluded and infatuated people  have been taught to believe that our lands were to be  won from us by the sword. From this same “Star” we  learn that, for want of more honest or commendable employ ment, many of their society are now preaching through [p. 331]
chairman of the said committee, submitted for the consideration of the meeting, the following;
Address, &c “This meeting, professing to act not from the excitement of the moment, but under a deep and abiding conviction that the occasion is one that calls for cool deliberation, as well as energetic action, deem it proper to lay before the public an expose of our peculiar situation, in regard to this singular sect of pretended christians, and a solemn declaration of our unalterable determination to amend it.
The evil is one that no one could have foreseen, and is therefore unprovided for by the laws, and the delays incident to legislation, would put the mischief beyond remedy.
But little more than two years ago, some two or three of these people made their appearance on the upper , and they now number some twelve hundred souls in the ; and each successive autumn and spring pours forth its swarms among us, with a gradual falling of the character of those who compose them; until it seems that those communities from which they come, were flooding us with the very dregs of their composition. Elevated as they mostly are, but little above the condition of our blacks, either in regard to property or education, they have become a subject of much anxiety on that part, serious and well grounded complaints having been already made of their corrupting influence on our slaves.
We are daily told, and not by the ignorant alone, but by all classes of them, that we, (the ,) of this are to be cut off, and our lands appropriated by them for . Whether this is to be accomplished by the hand of the destroying angel, the judgments of God, or the arm of power, they are not fully agreed among themselves.
Some recent remarks in the “Evening and Morning Star,” their organ in this place, by their tendency to moderate such hopes and repress such desires, shew plainly that many of this deluded and infatuated people have been taught to believe that our lands were to be won from us by the sword. From this same “Star” we learn that, for want of more honest or commendable employment, many of their society are now preaching through [p. 331]
Page 331