History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 365
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done, under circum[HC 1:424]stances like ours, is to ascertain and fix upon the amount of fee to be paid, and to secure the payment thereof by the necessary papers; and then the responsibility of advising falls upon us. We are now laboring under all the disadvantages of an engagement, without any of its advantages; it therefore becomes necessary us to know, whether we can agree as to the fee, or not; and that we should be paid, too, according to the situation in which we place ourselves. We have been doing a practice here, among these people, to a considerable extent, and, by this engagement, we must expect to loose the greatest part of it, which will be to all of us a considerable loss; besides that the amount involved must be very considerable, and the amount involved must be generally the criterion of the fee. Taking all these matters into consideration, we propose to you to bring all the suits you may want brought, and attend to them jointly throughout, for the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars each, making for all four of us the sum of one thousand dollars.
This may seem to be a large sum for a fee for Lawyers in this country, but the circumstances here involved make it necessary. This matter must be attended to in the first place, and then such advice, for the present, as may seem to be dictated by wisdom, and be necessary, we will give you; and in the proper time, we will bring the Suits. If this proposal suits, you will please execute notes, and send them to us: and if not agreed to apprise us by letter immediately, for we can be engaged on the opposite side in all probability. We prefer to bring your suits, as we have been threatened by the mob we wish to shew them we disregard their empty bravadoes.
, , &
As a derneir resort, the brethren accepted the foregoing proposition, and and , gave their note of one thousand dollars, endorsed by and . No sooner had this news spread among the [p. 365]
done, under circum[HC 1:424]stances like ours, is to ascertain and fix upon the amount of fee to be paid, and to secure the payment thereof by the necessary papers; and then the responsibility of advising falls upon us. We are now laboring under all the disadvantages of an engagement, without any of its advantages; it therefore becomes us to know, whether we can agree as to the fee, or not; and that we should be paid, too, according to the situation in which we place ourselves. We have been doing a practice here, among these people, to a considerable extent, and, by this engagement, we must expect to loose the greatest part of it, which will be to all of us a considerable loss; besides that the amount involved must be very considerable, and the amount involved must be generally the criterion of the fee. Taking all these matters into consideration, we propose to you to bring all the suits you may want brought, and attend to them jointly throughout, for the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars each, making for all four of us the sum of one thousand dollars.
This may seem to be a large sum for a fee for Lawyers in this country, but the circumstances here involved make it necessary. This matter must be attended to in the first place, and then such advice, for the present, as may seem to be dictated by wisdom, and be necessary, we will give you; and in the proper time, we will bring the Suits. If this proposal suits, you will please execute notes, and send them to us: and if not agreed to apprise us by letter immediately, for we can be engaged on the opposite side in all probability. We prefer to bring your suits, as we have been threatened by the mob we wish to shew them we disregard their empty bravadoes.
, , &
As a derneir resort, the brethren accepted the foregoing proposition, and and , gave their note of one thousand dollars, endorsed by and . No sooner had this news spread among the [p. 365]
Page 365