History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 382
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either volunteers or otherwise, they will, I have no  doubt, be supplied with public arms. This must  be upon application, therefore,— As a volunteer  company must be accepted by the colonel, and  that is a matter in his discretion, perhaps the  best way would be to organize and elect officers  as is done in ordinary cases,— Not volunteers,  you could give them the necessary directions on  these points. If the Colonel should refuse to order  an election of company officers, after they have  reported themselves to him for that purpose, he  would, I presume, be courtmartialed therefore,  on a representation to the of the facts.  As only a certain quantity of public arms can  be distributed in each county, those who first  apply will be most likely to receive them: The  less, therefore, that is said upon the subject, the better.
I am with great respect, your Obt Servt,”
(Signed) “R. W. Wells.”
Again, on the 24th. wrote , Esquire, <circuit Attorney,> of the same counsel, as follows.
“New Lexington, November 24th., 1833.
Dear Sir, I have been requested by the to  inform him about the outrageous acts of unparallelled  violence that have lately happened in ,  and have also been requested to examine into these  outrages and take steps to punish the guilty and  screen the innocent.
I cannot proceed, unless some person shall be  willing to make the proper information before me.  I now request you to inform me whether the Mormons  are willing to take legal steps against the citizens  of ? Whether they wish to return there,  or not? and let me know all the matters connected  with this unhappy affair. It will be necessary for  you to see the persons injured, and be informed  of their desires and intentions. The military force  will repair to to aid the execution of any  order I make on this subject. Be particular in [p. 382]
either volunteers or otherwise, they will, I have no doubt, be supplied with public arms. This must be upon application, therefore,— As a volunteer company must be accepted by the colonel, and that is a matter in his discretion, perhaps the best way would be to organize and elect officers as is done in ordinary cases,— Not volunteers, you could give them the necessary directions on these points. If the Colonel should refuse to order an election of company officers, after they have reported themselves to him for that purpose, he would, I presume, be courtmartialed on a representation to the of the facts. As only a certain quantity of public arms can be distributed in each county, those who first apply will be most likely to receive them: The less, therefore, that is said upon the subject, the better.
I am with great respect, your Obt Servt,”
(Signed) “R. W. Wells.”
Again, wrote , Esquire, circuit Attorney, of the same counsel, as follows.
“New Lexington, November 24th., 1833.
Dear Sir, I have been requested by the to inform him about the outrageous acts of unparallelled violence that have lately happened in , and have also been requested to examine into these outrages and take steps to punish the guilty and screen the innocent.
I cannot proceed, unless some person shall be willing to make the proper information before me. I now request you to inform me whether the Mormons are willing to take legal steps against the citizens of ? Whether they wish to return there, or not? and let me know all the matters connected with this unhappy affair. It will be necessary for you to see the persons injured, and be informed of their desires and intentions. The military force will repair to to aid the execution of any order I make on this subject. Be particular [p. 382]
Page 382