History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 391
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possessed by the mob of , or others, and are now un[HC 1:451]lawfully detained from the use and possession of our people; that whereas our people have been driven and scattered into the counties of , , Van Beuren, , and others, where in many cases, they are destitute of the common necessaries of life in this, even this winter season; and that whereas the guns which were taken from our people, as set forth in the affidavit, are kept from them;— Therefore, in behalf of our society, which is so scattered and suffering, we, your petitioners, ask aid and assistance of your Excellency, that we may be restored to our lands, houses, and property, and protected in them by the militia of the . if legal, or by a detachment of the Rangers, which might be located at , instead of “Cantonement <at> Leavenworth” till peace can be restored -[This could be done probably, by conferring with the president, or perhaps with General Dodge]- Also we ask, that our men may be organized into companies of Guards, and be furnished with arms by the state, to assist in maintaining their rights against the unhallowed power of the mob of :
And then, when arrangements are made to protect us in our persons, and property, (which cannot be done without an armed force, nor would it be prudent to risque our lives there, without guards, till we receive strength from our friends, to protect ourselves) we wish a court of enquiry instituted to investigate the whole matter of the Mob against the Mormons, and we will ever pray.
(signed) ,
. Mo.) .
December 6th 1833) , .
, ,”
The following letter accompanied the foregoing petition:
December 6th. 1833.
Dear Sir,
Your Excellency will perceive by the Petition [p. 391]
possessed by the mob of , or others, and are now un[HC 1:451]lawfully detained from the use and possession of our people; that whereas our people have been driven and scattered into the counties of , , Van Beuren, , and others, where in many cases, they are destitute of the common necessaries of life in this, even this winter season; and that whereas the guns which were taken from our people, as set forth in the affidavit, are kept from them;— Therefore, in behalf of our society, which is so scattered and suffering, we, your petitioners, ask aid and assistance of your Excellency, that we may be restored to our lands, houses, and property, and protected in them by the militia of the . if legal, or by a detachment of the Rangers, which might be located at , instead of “Cantonement at Leavenworth” till peace can be restored -[This could be done probably, by conferring with the president, or perhaps with General Dodge]- Also we ask, that our men may be organized into companies of Guards, and be furnished with arms by the state, to assist in maintaining their rights against the unhallowed power of the mob of :
And then, when arrangements are made to protect us in our persons, and property, (which cannot be done without an armed force, nor would it be prudent to risque our lives there, without guards, till we receive strength from our friends, to protect ourselves) we wish a court of enquiry instituted to investigate the whole matter of the Mob against the Mormons, and we will ever pray.
(signed) ,
. Mo.) .
December 6th 1833) , .
, ,”
The following letter accompanied the foregoing petition:
December 6th. 1833.
Dear Sir,
Your Excellency will perceive by the Petition [p. 391]
Page 391