History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 47
image
and followed on my behalf. They held forth in true colours, the nature  of the prosecution; the malignancy of intention, and the apparent disposition to  persecute their client, rather than to afford him justice. They took up the dif ferent arguments which had been brought by the lawyers for the prosecution  and having shewed their utter futility and misapplication; then proceeded to  scrutinise the evidence which had been adduced, and each in his turn, thanked  God that He had been engaged in so good a cause, as that of defending a man  whose character stood so well the test of such a strict investigation. In  fact, these men, (although not regular lawyers) were upon this occasion able  to put to silence their opponents, and convince the court that I was innocent.
They spoke like men inspired of God, whilst those who were arrayed against  me, trembled under the sound of their voices, and quailed before them like crim inals before a bar of justice.
The majority of the assembled multitude had now began to find that  nothing could be sustained against me: even the Constable who arrested <me,> and  treated me so badly— now came and apologized to me, and asked my forgiveness  <for> of <for> his behaviour towards me; and so far was he changed that he informed me  that the mob were determined, that if the Court acquitted me; that they would  have me, and rail ride me, and tar and feather me; and further, that he was  willing to favour me, and lead me out in safety by another <a private> way.
The Court finding the charges against me, not sustained, I  was accordingly acquitted, to the great satisfaction of my friends, and vexation  of my enemies, who were still determined upon molesting me, but through  the instrumentality of my new friend, the Constable; I was enabled to escape  them, and make my way in safety to my wifes sister’s house, where I found  my awaiting with much anxiety the issue of these <those> ungodly proceedings: and  with her in company next day arrived in safety at my own house.
After a few days however, I again returned to , in  company with , for the purpose of those whom we had  thus been forced to abandon <leave> for a time. We had scarcely arrived at ’s  when the mob was seen collecting together to oppose us, and we considered it  wisdom to leave for home, which we did, without even waiting for any refresh ment. Our enemies pursued us, and it was oftentimes as much as we could do  to elude them; however we managed to get home, after having travelled all  night, except a short time, during which we were forced to rest ourselve[s] under  a large tree by the way side, sleeping and watching alternately. And thus  were we persecuted on account of our religious faith— in a country, the consti tution of which, guarantees to every man the indefeasible right, to worship God  according to the dictates of his own conscience; and by men too, who were professors [p. 47]
and followed on my behalf. They held forth in true colours, the nature of the prosecution; the malignancy of intention, and the apparent disposition to persecute their client, rather than to afford him justice. They took up the different arguments which had been brought by the lawyers for the prosecution and having shewed their utter futility and misapplication; then proceeded to scrutinise the evidence which had been adduced, and each in his turn, thanked God that He had been engaged in so good a cause, as that of defending a man whose character stood so well the test of such a strict investigation. In fact, these men, (although not regular lawyers) were upon this occasion able to put to silence their opponents, and convince the court that I was innocent.
They spoke like men inspired of God, whilst those who were arrayed against me, trembled under the sound of their voices, and quailed before them like criminals before a bar of justice.
The majority of the assembled multitude had now began to find that nothing could be sustained against me: even the Constable who arrested me, and treated me so badly— now came and apologized to me, and asked my forgiveness for for his behaviour towards me; and so far was he changed that he informed me that the mob were determined, that if the Court acquitted me; that they would have me, and rail ride me, and tar and feather me; and further, that he was willing to favour me, and lead me out in safety by a private way.
The Court finding the charges against me, not sustained, I was accordingly acquitted, to the great satisfaction of my friends, and vexation of my enemies, who were still determined upon molesting me, but through the instrumentality of my new friend, the Constable; I was enabled to escape them, and make my way in safety to my wifes sister’s house, where I found my awaiting with much anxiety the issue of those ungodly proceedings: and with her in company next day arrived in safety at my own house.
After a few days however, I again returned to , in company with , for the purpose of those whom we had thus been forced to leave for a time. We had scarcely arrived at ’s when the mob was seen collecting together to oppose us, and we considered it wisdom to leave for home, which we did, without even waiting for any refreshment. Our enemies pursued us, and it was oftentimes as much as we could do to elude them; however we managed to get home, after having travelled all night, except a short time, during which we were forced to rest ourselves under a large tree by the way side, sleeping and watching alternately. And thus were we persecuted on account of our religious faith— in a country, the constitution of which, guarantees to every man the indefeasible right, to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience; and by men too, who were professors [p. 47]
Page 47