History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 12 [addenda]
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could not tell how many there were— This thing was attempted many times in villages and towns as we passed through, but the people were never able to ascertain our number— travelled 24 miles, crossed the Ferry River at Phillip’s Ferry and encamped on the West Bank— we this morning sent brother to ascertain the feelings of the people and report to us— the country we passed through was one of great beauty, tho’ little settled. (page 482*)
Addenda, Note 8 • 4–5 June 1834
<Note 8.> our commisary also purchased about, <and> a dozen [illegible] <Missouri cured> hams, which proved to have been a little injured on the outside, there not being enough to supply one for every Company, my Company agreed to do without— our supper consisted of mush and honey, as we had been unable to procure flour on account of the scarcity of Mills— After the fatigues of the day it hardly satisfied our hunger, but when we had just finished, some six or eight of the hams were brought to our tent door, and thrown down in anger, saying “we don’t eat stinking meat”, I called on brother our Cook and told him to be quick and fry some ham, as I had not had my hunger fairly allayed for 48 hours, he immediately commenced cooking the ham, and for once all our <my> Company feasted to their full satisfaction. We had just retired to rest when the picket Guard announced , he came into our tent and made his report, he had visited a number of influential men, among the rest a Baptist minister, who expressed great anxiety that our company should be stopped— and went to a magistrate to enquire if there was not some law or pretext for stopping us— he the Priest said to the magistrate “that company march and have guns like an army— they pitch their tents by the side of the Road— they set out guards and let nobody pass into their Camp in the night— and they are Mormons— and I believe they are going to kill the people up in Missouri, and retake their lands.” the Magistrate replied “if you was traveling and did not wish to put up at public houses, or there was none in the Country, would you not camp by the road side in a tent? and if you was afraid that your horses, or property, would be stolen in a strange Country would you not watch and keep guards?” “Why yes” said the Priest “but they are Mormons”! “Well, I can’t hear but they mind their own business, and if you, and this Stranger -[meaning ]- will mind your own business, every thing will be right.” this Baptist Priest treated brother with great politeness, gave him his dinner, his wife washed his stockings, gave him letters of introduction to men in delivered to his charge some letters which he had received from which brother brought into the <He> also stated that he had seen a man that morning, who informed him that 400 men were in readiness on the side, with ten hours notice, to use up all the camp, and he was on the <his> way to give them the notice— a little before midnight we heard several guns fired in the west of us, which appeared to be answered by one directly East— there was no settlement west of us nearer than the State of — this appearing so much like a signal, in addition to the many threats of our being attacked on crossing the Mississippi, I considered sufficient cause of alarm to put out a double picket guard and place the Camp in a state of defence, so that every man might be ready at a moment’s notice— it however proved to be a false alarm.
Wednesday 4. we crossed the Snye Island which was about five miles wide, and encamped on the bank of the Mississippi, we were short of provisions, having little else but Indian Meal, and no water except the river, only what we boated across the Mississippi, many [p. 12 [addenda]]
could not tell how many there were— This thing was attempted many times in villages and towns as we passed through, but the people were never able to ascertain our number— travelled 24 miles, crossed the River at Phillip’s Ferry and encamped on the West Bank— we this morning sent brother to ascertain the feelings of the people and report to us— the country we passed through was one of great beauty, tho’ little settled. (page 482*)
Addenda, Note 8 • 4–5 June 1834
Note 8. , and a dozen Missouri cured hams, which proved to have been a little injured on the outside, there not being enough to supply one for every Company, my Company agreed to do without— our supper consisted of mush and honey, as we had been unable to procure flour on account of the scarcity of Mills— After the fatigues of the day it hardly satisfied our hunger, but when we had just finished, some six of the hams were brought to our tent door, and thrown down in anger, saying “we don’t eat stinking meat”, I called on brother our Cook and told him to be quick and fry some ham, as I had not had my hunger fairly allayed for 48 hours, he immediately commenced cooking the ham, and for once my Company feasted to their full satisfaction. We had just retired to rest when the picket Guard announced , he came into our tent and made his report, he had visited a number of influential men, among the rest a Baptist minister, who expressed great anxiety that our company should be stopped— and went to a magistrate to enquire if there was not some law or pretext for stopping us— he the Priest said to the magistrate “that company march and have guns like an army— they pitch their tents by the side of the Road— they set out guards and let nobody pass into their Camp in the night— and they are Mormons— and I believe they are going to kill the people up in Missouri, and retake their lands.” the Magistrate replied “if you was traveling and did not wish to put up at public houses, or there was none in the Country, would you not camp by the road side in a tent? and if you was afraid that your horses, or property, would be stolen in a strange Country would you not watch and keep guards?” “Why yes” said the Priest “but they are Mormons”! “Well, I can’t hear but they mind their own business, and if you, and this Stranger -[meaning ]- will mind your own business, every thing will be right.” this Baptist Priest treated brother with great politeness, gave him his dinner, his wife washed his stockings, gave him letters of introduction to men in delivered to his charge some letters which he had received from which brother brought into the — He also stated that he had seen a man that morning, who informed him that 400 men were in readiness on the side, with ten hours notice, to use up all the camp, and he was on his way to give them the notice— a little before midnight we heard several guns fired in the west of us, which appeared to be answered by one directly East— there was no settlement west of us nearer than the State of — this appearing so much like a signal, in addition to the many threats of our being attacked on crossing the Mississippi, I considered sufficient cause of alarm to put out a double picket guard and place the Camp in a state of defence, so that every man might be ready at a moment’s notice— it however proved to be a false alarm.
Wednesday 4. we crossed the Snye Island which was about five miles wide, and encamped on the bank of the Mississippi, we were short of provisions, having little else but Indian Meal, and no water except the river, only what we boated across the Mississippi, many [p. 12 [addenda]]
Page 12 [addenda]