History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 15 [addenda]
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discovered two Prairie Rattle Snakes quietly sleeping under them, which they carefully carried  out of the Camp— this day my health was so poor, I left the affairs of the to the management  of — having no provisions we travelled seventeen miles before breakfast,  and I rode in ’s Waggon, we crossed a slough half a mile wide, thro’ which  most of the brethren were obliged to wade waist deep in mud and water— General who had travelled from without a stocking on his foot, carried brother thro’ on his back— our breakfast consisted entirely of Corn Meal Mush, or hasty pudding,  we had not meal enough in our Company to make the mush of the consistence of good  starch, after our ten o clock breakfast we passed on to within one mile of — we  encamped in a very small prairie surrounded by a thicket of hazel brush— when I  arrived where the Camp had pitched their tents and viewed our unsafe location,—  considering the danger of an attack from our enemies, I almost forgot my sickness,  went some distance in the brush, bowed down and prayed my heavenly Father to suffer  no evil to come upon us, but keep us safely thro’ the night— I obtained an assurance  that we should be safe until morning, notwithstanding about 50 of the Mob  crossed the Lexington Ferry that evening for the purpose of joining the mob, and  of making an attack upon us— all was quiet in the Camp thro’ the night— while the  brethren were making their bed in Captain ’s tent, one of them discovered a  very musical Rattle Snake which they were about to kill, told them not to  hurt him but carry him out of the tent, when brother Carpenter took him in his hands  carried him beyond all danger and left him to enjoy his liberty— telling him not to return—
Thursday 19 at day break, feeling that we were in a very unsafe situation I counselled the  camp to move forward without delay, and continued a lively march for about nine miles  where we stopt for breakfast, while passing thro’ brother observed  a black woman in a gentleman’s garden near the road. She beckoned to him and said  “come here massa.” She was evidently much agitated in her feelings. He went up to the fence  and she said to him, there is a company of men laying in wait here, who are calculating  to kill you this morning as you pass through”, we halted for breakfast on an eminence near  a Farm House, the owner furnished us with a large quantity of milk, which gave a great  relish to our Bacon and Corn Dodger, which our commissary had procured that morning, when  we asked the price of his milk he repled “he is a mean man that will sell milk, I could  have let you had more, if I had known you had been coming”, he further said “you have many  enemies about here, and you may meet with some trouble, and it is a damd shame that  every man cant come up and enjoy his religion, and every thing else without being molested.”  it was near noon when we finished our breakfast, and we passed on in fine Spirits,—  determined to go thro’ and meet the brethren in , we travelled but a short  distance when one waggon broke down; and the wheels ran off from others, and there seemed  to be many things to hinder our progress, altho’ we strove with all diligence to speed our way  forward,— This night we camped on an elevated piece of land, between Little Fishing  and Big fishing Rivers which was formed by seven small streams or branches. <Page 495*> [p. 15 [addenda]]
discovered two Prairie Rattle Snakes quietly sleeping under them, which they carefully carried out of the Camp— this day my health was so poor, I left the affairs of the to the management of — having no provisions we travelled seventeen miles before breakfast, and I rode in ’s Waggon, we crossed a slough half a mile wide, thro’ which most of the brethren were obliged to wade waist deep in mud and water— General who had travelled from without a stocking on his foot, carried brother thro’ on his back— our breakfast consisted entirely of Corn Meal Mush, or hasty pudding, we had not meal enough in our Company to make the mush of the consistence of good starch, after our ten o clock breakfast we passed on to within one mile of — we encamped in a very small prairie surrounded by a thicket of hazel brush— when I arrived where the Camp had pitched their tents and viewed our unsafe location,— considering the danger of an attack from our enemies, I almost forgot my sickness, went some distance in the brush, bowed down and prayed my heavenly Father to suffer no evil to come upon us, but keep us safely thro’ the night— I obtained an assurance that we should be safe until morning, notwithstanding about 50 of the Mob crossed the Lexington Ferry that evening for the purpose of joining the mob, and of making an attack upon us— all was quiet in the Camp thro’ the night— while the brethren were making their bed in Captain ’s tent, one of them discovered a very musical Rattle Snake which they were about to kill, told them not to hurt him but carry him out of the tent, when brother Carpenter took him in his hands carried him beyond all danger and left him to enjoy his liberty— telling him not to return—
Thursday 19 at day break, feeling that we were in a very unsafe situation I counselled the camp to move forward without delay, and continued a lively march for about nine miles where we stopt for breakfast, while passing thro’ brother observed a black woman in a gentleman’s garden near the road. She beckoned to him and said “come here massa.” She was evidently much agitated in her feelings. He went up to the fence and she said to him, there is a company of men laying in wait here, who are calculating to kill you this morning as you pass through”, we halted for breakfast on an eminence near a Farm House, the owner furnished us with a large quantity of milk, which gave a great relish to our Bacon and Corn Dodger, which our commissary had procured that morning, when we asked the price of his milk he repled “he is a mean man that will sell milk, I could have let you had more, if I had known you had been coming”, he further said “you have many enemies about here, and you may meet with some trouble, and it is a damd shame that every man cant come up and enjoy his religion, and every thing else without being molested.” it was near noon when we finished our breakfast, and we passed on in fine Spirits,— determined to go thro’ and meet the brethren in , we travelled but a short distance when one waggon broke down; and the wheels ran off from others, and there seemed to be many things to hinder our progress, altho’ we strove with all diligence to speed our way forward,— This night we camped on an elevated piece of land, between Little Fishing and Big fishing Rivers which was formed by seven small streams or branches. Page 495* [p. 15 [addenda]]
Page 15 [addenda]