History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 852
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<November 2> Sun in the evening to produce and deliver them. We then returned to Camp, and I  directed the troops to make preparations to march to by an hour and a half  by sun, with a determination, in case the hostages were not produced, to make an  attack upon the Town forthwith. I directed brigade to be mounted, and  to form on the right of the Division, to act as flankers if necessary, and if required to pass  entirely around the Town, and form on the north side, with instructions to make the  attack at the report of the Cannon, which was to be the signal for the general attack.  General Graham’s brigade was mounted and formed on the extreme left to act as  flankers, and if required to form the line on the West side, with similar—  instructions as to the commencement of the attack. ’s brigade was  ordered to parade on foot, and to form on the left of , with instructions  to form the line of battle on the South side, with same instructions as to commencement  of attack. The Artillery Company with one piece of Ordinance was placed at the  head of ’s and ’s brigade, with instructions to occupy an  eminence within three hundred yards of the Town. The army being disposed  of in this manner, at the appointed time I took up the line of march in direction  of . When the troops got within about six hundred yards I discovered  the Flag and the hostages advancing. I immediately halted the army, and rode  out and met them, received the hostages and placed a guard over them for their  safety and protection, and ordered the forces back to our encampment. I cannot  forbear, at this point, expressing my gratification and approbation of the good  conduct and gallant <+> bravery evinced by all the officers and men under my  command. They marched up with as much determination, and deliberation  as old veterans— not knowing but that the charge would be sounded every  moment for surrounding the Town. There was no noise or confusion, nothing  but an eager anxiety upon the countenance of every man to get at the work.  When the hostages were received, the troops, with some slight exceptions, marched back  in <ɵ> profound silence”—
-[The wicked flee when no man pursueth. This saying was truly  verified in the first retreat of this army. they fled precipitately through fear, and a  great proportion of the men were anxious to get back to the Creek, where they could  dispense with some of their clothing and wash themselves in the Water.
+ “Gallant bravery,” that some thousands of men should be so anxious to wash their  hands in the blood of 500 poor Saints, I claim not the honor of commanding such a  brave army. ɵ “profound silence”— It might have been silence to the for aught  I know, for the shoutings, bellowings and yells of this army of Mobocrats was sufficient  to deafen any one, not guarded by some higher Spirit, and could only be equalled in  the savage war whoop, and the yells of the damned]-——
“November 1st. I ordered the whole forces amounting to twenty five hundred men to  parade at 9 o clock A.M. and to take up the line of March for , at half  past 9 o’clock, to receive the prisoners and their arms. The troops marched out  and formed in the prairie about 200 yards south east of the Town. ’s Brigade  formed the West line, ’s the East line, Gen Graham’s and the  South line, with the Artillery Company and the Cannon in the centre of the two latter,  leaving one side of the square open. The Mormon army reduced to about 600 men by desertion [p. 852]
November 2 Sun in the evening to produce and deliver them. We then returned to Camp, and I directed the troops to make preparations to march to by an hour and a half by sun, with a determination, in case the hostages were not produced, to make an attack upon the Town forthwith. I directed brigade to be mounted, and to form on the right of the Division, to act as flankers if necessary, and if required to pass entirely around the Town, and form on the north side, with instructions to make the attack at the report of the Cannon, which was to be the signal for the general attack. General Graham’s brigade was mounted and formed on the extreme left to act as flankers, and if required to form the line on the West side, with similar— instructions as to the commencement of the attack. ’s brigade was ordered to parade on foot, and to form on the left of , with instructions to form the line of battle on the South side, with same instructions as to commencement of attack. The Artillery Company with one piece of Ordinance was placed at the head of ’s and ’s brigade, with instructions to occupy an eminence within three hundred yards of the Town. The army being disposed of in this manner, at the appointed time I took up the line of march in direction of . When the troops got within about six hundred yards I discovered the Flag and the hostages advancing. I immediately halted the army, and rode out and met them, received the hostages and placed a guard over them for their safety and protection, and ordered the forces back to our encampment. I cannot forbear, at this point, expressing my gratification and approbation of the good conduct and gallant + bravery evinced by all the officers and men under my command. They marched up with as much determination, and deliberation as old veterans— not knowing but that the charge would be sounded every moment for surrounding the Town. There was no noise or confusion, nothing but an eager anxiety upon the countenance of every man to get at the work. When the hostages were received, the troops, with some slight exceptions, marched back in ɵ profound silence”—
-[The wicked flee when no man pursueth. This saying was truly verified in the first retreat of this army. they fled precipitately through fear, and a great proportion of the men were anxious to get back to the Creek, where they could dispense with some of their clothing and wash themselves in the Water.
+ “Gallant bravery,” that some thousands of men should be so anxious to wash their hands in the blood of 500 poor Saints, I claim not the honor of commanding such a brave army. ɵ “profound silence”— It might have been silence to the for aught I know, for the shoutings, bellowings and yells of this army of Mobocrats was sufficient to deafen any one, not guarded by some higher Spirit, and could only be equalled in the savage war whoop, and the yells of the damned]-——
“November 1st. I ordered the whole forces amounting to twenty five hundred men to parade at 9 o clock A.M. and to take up the line of March for , at half past 9 o’clock, to receive the prisoners and their arms. The troops marched out and formed in the prairie about 200 yards south east of the Town. ’s Brigade formed the West line, ’s the East line, Gen Graham’s and the South line, with the Artillery Company and the Cannon in the centre of the two latter, leaving one side of the square open. The Mormon army reduced to about 600 men by desertion [p. 852]
Page 852