History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<January 15> liberally to our necessities, as the Citizens of en masse, and the people of  , generally, seemed to emulate each other in this labor of love. We would,  however, make honorable mention of , , General Leech,  , Revd. Mr. Young, Col. Henry N. Bushnell, John Wood, J. N. Morris,  S[ylvester] M. Bartlett, Samuel Holmes, and J. T. Holmes, Esquires, who will long be remembered  by a grateful community for their philanthropy to a suffering people, and whose  kindness on that occasion is indelibly engraven on that tablet of our hearts, in  golden letters of love. We would, likewise, make mention of the Legislature  of this , who, without respect of parties, without reluctance, freely, openly,  boldly and nobly, have come forth to our assistance, owned us as citizens and  friends, and took us by the hand, and extended to us all the blessings of civil,  political, and religious liberty, by granting us, under date of Decr. 16. 1840, one of  the most liberal charters, with the most plenary powers, ever conferred by a  legislative assembly on free citizens, for “The City of ,” The “Nauvoo Legion”  and the “University of the City of Nauvoo,” The first of these Charters, (that  for the “City of ,”) secures to us in all time to come, irrevocably all those  great blessings of civil liberty, which of right appertain to all the free Citizens  of a great civilized republic— ’tis all we ever claimed. What a contrast does the  proceedings of the legislature of this present, when compared with those  of , whose bigotry, jealousy, and superstition, prevailed to such an  extent, as to deny us our liberty and our sacred rights— has set a  glorious example, to the whole and to the world at large, and has  nobly carried out the principles of her Constitution, and the constitution of these  , and while she requires of us implicit obedience to the laws, (which  we hope ever to see observed) she affords us the protection of law— the security of life,  liberty, and the peaceable pursuit of happiness. The name of our City  () is of Hebrew origin, and signifies a beautiful situation, or place, carrying  with it, also, the idea of rest; and is truly descriptive of this most delightful situation. It is  situated on the Eastern bank of the , at the head of the Des Moines  Rapids in ; bounded on the east by an extensive prairie of surpassing  beauty, and on the north, west and south, by the . This place has been  objected to by some, on account of the sickness which has prevailed in the summer  months, but it is the opinion of , a physician of great experience  and medical knowledge, that , and all the Eastern and Southern  portions of the City of , are as healthy as any other portions of the western  country, (or the world to acclimated citizens) whilst the north western portion of the   has experienced much affliction from fever and ague, which, however, he  thinks can be easily remedied by draining the sloughs on the adjacent islands  in the . The population of our city is increasing with unparalleled  rapidity, numbering more than three thousand inhabitants. Every facility is afforded  in the and adjacent Country in , for the successful prosecution  of the mechanical arts, and the pleasing pursuits of agriculture. The waters  of the can be successfully used for manufacturing purposes, to an  almost unlimited extent. Having been instrumental in the hands of [p. 1144]
January 15 liberally to our necessities, as the Citizens of en masse, and the people of , generally, seemed to emulate each other in this labor of love. We would, however, make honorable mention of , , General Leech, , Revd. Mr. Young, Col. Henry N. Bushnell, John Wood, J. N. Morris, Sylvester M. Bartlett, Samuel Holmes, and J. T. Holmes, Esquires, who will long be remembered by a grateful community for their philanthropy to a suffering people, and whose kindness on that occasion is indelibly engraven on that tablet of our hearts, in golden letters of love. We would, likewise, make mention of the Legislature of this , who, without respect of parties, without reluctance, freely, openly, boldly and nobly, have come forth to our assistance, owned us as citizens and friends, and took us by the hand, and extended to us all the blessings of civil, political, and religious liberty, by granting us, under date of Decr. 16. 1840, one of the most liberal charters, with the most plenary powers, ever conferred by a legislative assembly on free citizens, for “The City of ,” The “Nauvoo Legion” and the “University of the City of Nauvoo,” The first of these Charters, (that for the “City of ,”) secures to us in all time to come, irrevocably all those great blessings of civil liberty, which of right appertain to all the free Citizens of a great civilized republic— ’tis all we ever claimed. What a contrast does the proceedings of the legislature of this present, when compared with those of , whose bigotry, jealousy, and superstition, prevailed to such an extent, as to deny us our liberty and our sacred rights— has set a glorious example, to the whole and to the world at large, and has nobly carried out the principles of her Constitution, and the constitution of these , and while she requires of us implicit obedience to the laws, (which we hope ever to see observed) she affords us the protection of law— the security of life, liberty, and the peaceable pursuit of happiness. The name of our City () is of Hebrew origin, and signifies a beautiful situation, or place, carrying with it, also, the idea of rest; and is truly descriptive of this most delightful situation. It is situated on the Eastern bank of the , at the head of the Des Moines Rapids in ; bounded on the east by an extensive prairie of surpassing beauty, and on the north, west and south, by the . This place has been objected to by some, on account of the sickness which has prevailed in the summer months, but it is the opinion of , , that , and all the Eastern and Southern portions of the City of , are as healthy as any other portions of the western country, (or the world to acclimated citizens) whilst the north western portion of the has experienced much affliction from fever and ague, which, however, he thinks can be easily remedied by draining the sloughs on the adjacent islands in the . The population of our city is increasing with unparalleled rapidity, numbering more than three thousand inhabitants. Every facility is afforded in the and adjacent Country in , for the successful prosecution of the mechanical arts, and the pleasing pursuits of agriculture. The waters of the can be successfully used for manufacturing purposes, to an almost unlimited extent. Having been instrumental in the hands of [p. 1144]
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