History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<October 9> to know all the facts. I have done all that I could on my part. I will still  do all that I can. I will not leave one Stone unturned. Now the facts  are these. I sent my Brother and with means in their hands—  say— not money— but with power to obtain every property or money which was  necessary to enable them to fulfil the contract I made with .  My brother was under the necessity of returning to this place on account  of his ill health, leaving the business in the hands of , with the  fullest expectation that he would make over the property or money to , and make every thing square, so far as the interest is concerned, if  not the principal. He was instructed to pay the interest that had accrued, and  should accrue up to the fall of 1842 so as to be in advance of our indebtedness.  I had also made arrangements with the Eastern Churches, and had it in my  power to deed over lands for the whole debt, and had expected that an arrangement  of that kind would have been entered into. I am well assured that  did not lack for any means whatever, to pay the interest at any rate, if not the  principal, and why he has not done according to my instructions God only knows.  I do not feel to charge him with having done wrong, until I can investigate the  matter and ascertain to a certainty where the fault lies. It may be that  through sickness or disaster, this strange neglect has happened. I would to God  the thing had not happened. When I read ’ letter I learned that  he was dissatisfied. I thought that he meant to oppress me, and felt accordingly  mortified and sorrowful in the midst of affliction to think that he should  distrust me for a moment, that I would not do all that was within my power.  But upon having an explanation of the whole matter, my feelings are changed;  and I think that you all have had cause for complaining; But you will, in the  magnanimity of your good feelings certainly not blame me, when you find  that I have discharged an honorable duty on my part. I regret exceedingly  that I did not know some time since what I now know, that I might have  made another effort before it got so late— Cold weather is now rolling in upon  us— I have been confined here this Season by sickness and various other  things that were beyond my control. such as having been demanded by the   of , of the of this , and he not having moral  courage enough to resist the demand, although it was founded in injustice  and cruelty. I accordingly was taken Prisoner, and they put me to some  ten or eleven hundred dollars expence and trouble such as Lawyers fees.  Witnesses &c &c before I could be redeemed from under the difficulty. But I am  now clear of them once more, and now in contemplating the face of the whole  subject, I find that I am under the necessity of asking a little further indulgence,  say till next Spring, so that I may be enabled to recover myself, and then if  God spares my life, and gives me power to do so, I will come in person  to your Country, and will never cease my labors until the whole matter is  completely adjusted to the full satisfaction of all of you. The subject of your  debt was fairly presented before our General Conference (held on the first of this month  consisting of some ten thousand people) for their decision on the wisest and best [p. 1233]
October 9 to know all the facts. I have done all that I could on my part. I will still do all that I can. I will not leave one Stone unturned. Now the facts are these. I sent my Brother and with means in their hands— say— not money— but with power to obtain every property or money which was necessary to enable them to fulfil the contract I made with . My brother was under the necessity of returning to this place on account of his ill health, leaving the business in the hands of , with the fullest expectation that he would make over the property or money to , and make every thing square, so far as the interest is concerned, if not the principal. He was instructed to pay the interest that had accrued, and should accrue up to the fall of 1842 so as to be in advance of our indebtedness. I had also made arrangements with the Eastern Churches, and had it in my power to deed over lands for the whole debt, and had expected that an arrangement of that kind would have been entered into. I am well assured that did not lack for any means whatever, to pay the interest at any rate, if not the principal, and why he has not done according to my instructions God only knows. I do not feel to charge him with having done wrong, until I can investigate the matter and ascertain to a certainty where the fault lies. It may be that through sickness or disaster, this strange neglect has happened. I would to God the thing had not happened. When I read ’ letter I learned that he was dissatisfied. I thought that he meant to oppress me, and felt accordingly mortified and sorrowful in the midst of affliction to think that he should distrust me for a moment, that I would not do all that was within my power. But upon having an explanation of the whole matter, my feelings are changed; and I think that you all have had cause for complaining; But you will, in the magnanimity of your good feelings certainly not blame me, when you find that I have discharged an honorable duty on my part. I regret exceedingly that I did not know some time since what I now know, that I might have made another effort before it got so late— Cold weather is now rolling in upon us— I have been confined here this Season by sickness and various other things that were beyond my control. such as having been demanded by the of , of the of this , and he not having moral courage enough to resist the demand, although it was founded in injustice and cruelty. I accordingly was taken Prisoner, and they put me to some ten or eleven hundred dollars expence and trouble such as Lawyers fees. Witnesses &c &c before I could be redeemed from under the difficulty. But I am now clear of them once more, and now in contemplating the face of the whole subject, I find that I am under the necessity of asking a little further indulgence, say till next Spring, so that I may be enabled to recover myself, and then if God spares my life, and gives me power to do so, I will come in person to your Country, and will never cease my labors until the whole matter is completely adjusted to the full satisfaction of all of you. The subject of your debt was fairly presented before our General Conference (held on the first of this month consisting of some ten thousand people) for their decision on the wisest and best [p. 1233]
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