History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 862
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<December 10 Memorial to Legislature> each one answered that he could not consent to comply with their propositions. One of the Mob replied that he was sorry, for the work of destruction would commence immediately. In a short time, the , which was a two story brick building, was assailed by the mob and soon thrown down, and with it much valuable property destroyed. Next they went to the for the same purpose, but , one of the owners, agreeing to close it, they abandoned their design. Their next move was their dragging of from his house and family to the public square, where, surrounded by hundreds, they partially stripped him of his clothes, and tarred and feathered him from head to foot— A man by the name of was also tarred at the same time— This was Saturday, and the mob agreed to meet the following Tuesday— to accomplish their purpose of driving or massacreing the Society. Tuesday came, and the mob came also, bearing with them a red flag in token of blood. Some two or three of the principal men of the Society offered their lives, if that would appease the wrath of the Mob, so that the rest of the Society might dwell in peace upon their lands. The answer was, that unless the Society would leave “en masse,” every man should die for himself. Being in a defenceless situation, to save a general massacre, it was agreed that one half of the Society should leave the by the first of the next January, and the remainder by the first of the following April. A treaty was entered into and ratified, and all things went on smoothly for a while. But some time in October the wrath of the mob began again to be kindled, insomuch, that they shot at some of our people, whipped others, and threw down their houses, and committed many other depredations; indeed the society of Saints were harassed for some time both day and night— their houses were brickbatted and broken open— women and children insulted &c. The of A. S. Gilbert & Co. was broken open, ransacked, and some if the goods strewed in the Streets. These abuses, with many others of a very aggravated nature, so stirred up the indignant feelings of our people, that <when> a party of them, say about 30, met a company of the mob of about double their number,—— a skirmish took place in which some two or three of the mob and one of our people. were killed. This raised as it were the whole in arms, and nothing would satisfy them, but an im[HC 3:218]mediate surrender of the arms of our people, and they forthwith to leave the Fifty one guns were given up, which have never been returned or paid for to this day. The next day parties of the mob, from 30 to 70, headed by Priests, went from house to house, threatning women and children with death if they were not off before they returned. This so alarmed them, that they fled in different directions; some took shelter in the woods, while others wandered in the prairies till their feet bled. In the mean time the weather being very cold, their sufferings in other respects were very great. The Society made their escape to as fast as they possibly could, where the people received them kindly, and administer to their wants. After the Society had left , their buildings amounting to about two hundred, were either burned or otherwise— destroyed, and much of their crops, as well as furniture, stock, &c— which if properly estimated, would make a large sum, for which they have not as yet received any [p. 862]
December 10 Memorial to Legislature each one answered that he could not consent to comply with their propositions. One of the Mob replied that he was sorry, for the work of destruction would commence immediately. In a short time, the , which was a two story brick building, was assailed by the mob and soon thrown down, and with it much valuable property destroyed. Next they went to the for the same purpose, but , one of the owners, agreeing to close it, they abandoned their design. Their next move was their dragging of from his house and family to the public square, where, surrounded by hundreds, they partially stripped him of his clothes, and tarred and feathered him from head to foot— A man by the name of was also tarred at the same time— This was Saturday, and the mob agreed to meet the following Tuesday— to accomplish their purpose of driving or massacreing the Society. Tuesday came, and the mob came also, bearing with them a red flag in token of blood. Some two or three of the principal men of the Society offered their lives, if that would appease the wrath of the Mob, so that the rest of the Society might dwell in peace upon their lands. The answer was, that unless the Society would leave “en masse,” every man should die for himself. Being in a defenceless situation, to save a general massacre, it was agreed that one half of the Society should leave the by the first of the next January, and the remainder by the first of the following April. A treaty was entered into and ratified, and all things went on smoothly for a while. But some time in October the wrath of the mob began again to be kindled, insomuch, that they shot at some of our people, whipped others, and threw down their houses, and committed many other depredations; indeed the society of Saints were harassed for some time both day and night— their houses were brickbatted and broken open— women and children insulted &c. The of A. S. Gilbert & Co. was broken open, ransacked, and some if the goods strewed in the Streets. These abuses, with many others of a very aggravated nature, so stirred up the indignant feelings of our people, that when a party of them, say about 30, met a company of the mob of about double their number,—— a skirmish took place in which some two or three of the mob and one of our people. were killed. This raised as it were the whole in arms, and nothing would satisfy them, but an im[HC 3:218]mediate surrender of the arms of our people, and they forthwith to leave the — Fifty one guns were given up, which have never been returned or paid for to this day. The next day parties of the mob, from 30 to 70, headed by Priests, went from house to house, threatning women and children with death if they were not off before they returned. This so alarmed them, that they fled in different directions; some took shelter in the woods, while others wandered in the prairies till their feet bled. In the mean time the weather being very cold, their sufferings in other respects were very great. The Society made their escape to as fast as they possibly could, where the people received them kindly, and administer to their wants. After the Society had left , their buildings amounting to about two hundred, were either burned or otherwise— destroyed, and much of their crops, as well as furniture, stock, &c— which if properly estimated, would make a large sum, for which they have not as yet received any [p. 862]
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