History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<December 10  Memorial to  Legislature> remuneration. The Society remained in nearly three years; when, at  the suggestion of the people there, they removed to that section of country known now  as . Here the people purchased out most of the former inhabitants,  and also entered much of the wild land. Many soon owned a number of  Eighties, while there was scarcely a man that did not secure to himself at least  a forty. Here we were permitted to enjoy peace for a season, but as our Society  increased in numbers, and settlements were made in and Carrol[l] Counties,  the mob spirit spread itself again— For months previous to our giving up our  arms to ’ army, we heard little else than rumors of mobs, collecting  in different places, and threatning our people. It is well known that the  people of our Church who had located themselves at , had to give up  to a mob and leave the place, notwithstanding the Militia were called out for  their protection. From the mob went towards , and while  on their way there they took two of our men prisoners and made them ride upon  the Cannon, and told them that they would drive the Mormons from to   and from to hell, and that they would give them no quarter  only at the cannon’s mouth. The threats of the Mob induced some of our  people to go to to help to protect their brethren who had settled at ,  on — The mob soon fled from : and after they  were dispersed and the cannon taken, during which time no blood was shed,  the people of returned to their homes in hopes of enjoying peace and  quiet; but in this they were disappointed, for a large mob was soon found to be  collecting on the Grindstone, <-[fork of ]-> from ten to fifteen miles off, under the command  of , a scouting party of which, came within four miles of ,  and drove off stock belonging to our people, in open day light. About this time word  came to that a party of the Mob had come into to the  south of — that they were taking horses and cattle— burning houses, and  ordering the Inhabitants to leave their homes immediately— and that they had  then actually in their possession three men prisoners. This report reached  in the evening and was confirmed about midnight. A company of about sixty  men went forth under the command of , to disperse the mob, as they  supposed. A battle was the result, in which and two of his men  were killed, and others wounded. , it appears, had but one killed, and others  wounded. Notwithstanding the unlawful acts committed by ’s men  previous to the battle, it is now asserted and claimed that he was regularly ordered  out as a militia captain, to preserve the peace along the line of and  Counties. That battle was fought four or five days previous to the arrival of and his army. About the time of the battle with , a number  of our people who were living near Haun’s Mills [Hawn’s Mill], on Shoal Creek, about twenty miles  below , together with a number of emigrants who had been stopped there  in consequence of the excitement, made an agreement with the Mob which was  about there, that neither party should molest the other, but dwell in peace. Shortly  after this agreement was made, a mob party of from two to three hundred, many of  whom are supposed to be from , some for , and also those who had [p. 863]
December 10 Memorial to Legislature remuneration. The Society remained in nearly three years; when, at the suggestion of the people there, they removed to that section of country known now as . Here the people purchased out most of the former inhabitants, and also entered much of the wild land. Many soon owned a number of Eighties, while there was scarcely a man that did not secure to himself at least a forty. Here we were permitted to enjoy peace for a season, but as our Society increased in numbers, and settlements were made in and Carroll Counties, the mob spirit spread itself again— For months previous to our giving up our arms to ’ army, we heard little else than rumors of mobs, collecting in different places, and threatning our people. It is well known that the people of our Church who had located themselves at , had to give up to a mob and leave the place, notwithstanding the Militia were called out for their protection. From the mob went towards , and while on their way there they took two of our men prisoners and made them ride upon the Cannon, and told them that they would drive the Mormons from to and from to hell, and that they would give them no quarter only at the cannon’s mouth. The threats of the Mob induced some of our people to go to to help to protect their brethren who had settled at , on — The mob soon fled from : and after they were dispersed and the cannon taken, during which time no blood was shed, the people of returned to their homes in hopes of enjoying peace and quiet; but in this they were disappointed, for a large mob was soon found to be collecting on the Grindstone, -[fork of ]- from ten to fifteen miles off, under the command of , a scouting party of which, came within four miles of , and drove off stock belonging to our people, in open day light. About this time word came to that a party of the Mob had come into to the south of — that they were taking horses and cattle— burning houses, and ordering the Inhabitants to leave their homes immediately— and that they had then actually in their possession three men prisoners. This report reached in the evening and was confirmed about midnight. A company of about sixty men went forth under the command of , to disperse the mob, as they supposed. A battle was the result, in which and two of his men were killed, and others wounded. , it appears, had but one killed, and others wounded. Notwithstanding the unlawful acts committed by ’s men previous to the battle, it is now asserted and claimed that he was regularly ordered out as a militia captain, to preserve the peace along the line of and Counties. That battle was fought four or five days previous to the arrival of and his army. About the time of the battle with , a number of our people who were living near Haun’s Mills Hawn’s Mill, on Shoal Creek, about twenty miles below , together with a number of emigrants who had been stopped there in consequence of the excitement, made an agreement with the Mob which was about there, that neither party should molest the other, but dwell in peace. Shortly after this agreement was made, a mob party of from two to three hundred, many of whom are supposed to be from , some for , and also those who had [p. 863]
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