History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<1841  Augt. 7> bigots, and begged of us to forgive him, which we did.
We continued our journey to Columbus, Hickman county,  Kentucky, and put up with Captain Robinson, formerly an officer  in the army, who treated us very kindly, assuring us that we were  welcome to stay at his house until a boat should come, if it were <three>  months. We staid nine days, during which a company of thirteen  hundred Cherokee Indians ferried over the river.
We went on board the Steamer Louisville, and had to pay all our  money for a deck passage. About ninety miles from  our boat got aground, where it lay three days. We had nothing  to eat but a little parched corn. We then went on board of a  little boat, <“>the Return<”>, which landed us in the next morning.  Here we found Elder and learned that Joseph was a  prisoner with many others, and that was Killed, and  of the sufferings of the Saints, which filled our hearts with sorrow.
The next morning we started on foot for home; at , about  200 miles, we stopped at the house of George Lyman to rest. ’s  feet had now become very sore with walking.
We had not been long in before the Mob made a  rally to use us up <as they said> with the rest of the Smith’s; and, at the earnest  request of our friends, we thought best to push on, and started  about ten at night. The wind was in our faces, the ground slippery,  and the night very dark; nevertheless we proceeded on our journey.  Travelling twenty-two miles, we came to the Chariton river, which  we found frozen over, but the ice too weak to bear us, and the boat  on the west side of the river. We went to the next ferry, but finding  there was no boat, and <knowing> that in the next neighborhood a man’s  brains were beat out, for being a ‘Mormon’, we returned to the  first ferry, and tried by hallooing to raise the ferryman on the  opposite side of the river, but were not able to awake him. We  were almost benumbed with the cold, and to warm ourselves we  commenced scuffling and jumping; we then beat our feet upon  the logs and stumps, in order to start a circulation of blood; but at  last became so cold and sleepy that he could not stand  it any longer, and lay down. I told him he was freezing to death;  I rolled him on the ground, pounding and thumping him; I then  cut a stick and said I would thrash him. At this he got up,  and undertook to thrash me; this stirred his blood a little,  but he soon lay down again. By this time the ferryman came [p. 16]
1841 Augt. 7 bigots, and begged of us to forgive him, which we did.
We continued our journey to Columbus, Hickman county, Kentucky, and put up with Captain Robinson, formerly an officer in the army, who treated us very kindly, assuring us that we were welcome to stay at his house until a boat should come, if it were three months. We staid nine days, during which a company of thirteen hundred Cherokee Indians ferried over the river.
We went on board the Steamer Louisville, and had to pay all our money for a deck passage. About ninety miles from our boat got aground, where it lay three days. We had nothing to eat but a little parched corn. We then went on board of a little boat, “the Return”, which landed us in the next morning. Here we found Elder and learned that Joseph was a prisoner with many others, and that was Killed, and of the sufferings of the Saints, which filled our hearts with sorrow.
The next morning we started on foot for home; at , about 200 miles, we stopped at the house of George Lyman to rest. ’s feet had now become very sore with walking.
We had not been long in before the Mob made a rally to use us up as they said with the rest of the Smith’s; and, at the earnest request of our friends, we thought best to push on, and started about ten at night. The wind was in our faces, the ground slippery, and the night very dark; nevertheless we proceeded on our journey. Travelling twenty-two miles, we came to the Chariton river, which we found frozen over, but the ice too weak to bear us, and the boat on the west side of the river. We went to the next ferry, but finding there was no boat, and knowing that in the next neighborhood a man’s brains were beat out, for being a ‘Mormon’, we returned to the first ferry, and tried by hallooing to raise the ferryman on the opposite side of the river, but were not able to awake him. We were almost benumbed with the cold, and to warm ourselves we commenced scuffling and jumping; we then beat our feet upon the logs and stumps, in order to start a circulation of blood; but at last became so cold and sleepy that he could not stand it any longer, and lay down. I told him he was freezing to death; I rolled him on the ground, pounding and thumping him; I then cut a stick and said I would thrash him. At this he got up, and undertook to thrash me; this stirred his blood a little, but he soon lay down again. By this time the ferryman came [p. 16]
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