History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 17
image
<1841  Augt. 7 > over, and set us across the river, where we warmed ourselves a little,  and pursued our journey until about breakfast time, when we  stopped at the house of a man, who, we afterwards learned, was  a leader of the mob at Haun’s [Hawn’s] Mill massacre; and started the  next morning without breakfast. Our route lay through a wild  prairie, where there was but very little track, and only one house  in forty miles. The north-west wind blew fiercely in our faces,  and the ground was so slippery that we could scarcely keep  our feet, and when the night came on, to add to our perplexity,  we lost our way; soon after which, I become so cold that  it was with great difficulty I could keep from freezing. We  also became extremely thirsty; however, we found a remedy  for this by cutting through ice three inches thick with a penknife.  While we were drinking, we heard a cow bell; this caused  our hearts to leap for joy, and we arose and steered our  course towards the sound. We soon entered Tenneys grove,  which sheltered us from the wind, and we felt more comfortable.  In a short time we came to the house, of Whitford G.  Wilson, where—— we were made welcome and  kindly entertained. We laid down to rest about two o’clock  in the morning, after having travelled one hundred and ten  miles in two days and two nights. After breakfast I set  out for , leaving sick with our hospitable  friend. When I arrived <on the evening of Dec 25> I was fortunate enough to find  my family alive, and in tolerable health; which was more  than I could have expected, considering the scenes of persecution  through which they had passed.”
visited us several times while we were in  Liberty Jail, and brought our wives to see us, and some  money and—— articles to relieve our necessities. He took  charge of ’s family in his flight from , and  saw them removed to , Illinois for safety.
In June 1839 he commenced making preparations for printing  the Times and Seasons. The press and type had been resurrected by  Elias Smith, and others, from its grave in Dawson’s  yard, , where it was buried for safety the night that   surrounded the with the mob militia. The  form for a No. of the Elder’s Journal was buried with the ink on  it. They were considerably injured by the damp; it was [p. 17]
1841 Augt. 7 over, and set us across the river, where we warmed ourselves a little, and pursued our journey until about breakfast time, when we stopped at the house of a man, who, we afterwards learned, was a leader of the mob at Haun’s [Hawn’s] Mill massacre; and started the next morning without breakfast. Our route lay through a wild prairie, where there was but very little track, and only one house in forty miles. The north-west wind blew fiercely in our faces, and the ground was so slippery that we could scarcely keep our feet, and when the night came on, to add to our perplexity, we lost our way; soon after which, I become so cold that it was with great difficulty I could keep from freezing. We also became extremely thirsty; however, we found a remedy for this by cutting through ice three inches thick with a penknife. While we were drinking, we heard a cow bell; this caused our hearts to leap for joy, and we arose and steered our course towards the sound. We soon entered Tenneys grove, which sheltered us from the wind, and we felt more comfortable. In a short time we came to the house, of Whitford G. Wilson, where—— we were made welcome and kindly entertained. We laid down to rest about two o’clock in the morning, after having travelled one hundred and ten miles in two days and two nights. After breakfast I set out for , leaving sick with our hospitable friend. When I arrived on the evening of Dec 25 I was fortunate enough to find my family alive, and in tolerable health; which was more than I could have expected, considering the scenes of persecution through which they had passed.”
visited us several times while we were in Liberty Jail, and brought our wives to see us, and some money and—— articles to relieve our necessities. He took charge of ’s family in his flight from , and saw them removed to , Illinois for safety.
In June 1839 he commenced making preparations for printing the Times and Seasons. The press and type had been resurrected by Elias Smith, and others, from its grave in Dawson’s yard, , where it was buried for safety the night that surrounded the with the mob militia. The form for a No. of the Elder’s Journal was buried with the ink on it. They were considerably injured by the damp; it was [p. 17]
Page 17