History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<1842  Jan 29> countries, for the strictest investigation. The Manufacturers are  evidently beginning to be jealous of the mechanics and workmen emigra ting with a people having so systematic an organization as the Latter  Day Saints display in their arrangements in this town.  I remain. Yours &c.

Addenda • 1 February 1842

<Feb 1> The following article is from the Millennial Star of this date.
Emigration
<Page 1273> In the midst of the general distress which prevails in this  country on account of want of employment, the high price of provisions,  the oppression, priestcraft, and iniquity of the land, it is pleasing to the  household of faith to contemplate a reserved by the Almighty  as a sure asylum for the poor and oppressed— a country every way  adapted to their wants and conditions— and still more pleasing to  think that thousands of the Saints have already made their escape  from this country and all its abuses and distress, and that they have  found a home, whereby persevering industry they may enjoy all the  blessings of liberty, peace, and plenty.
It is not yet two years since the Saints in England, in obe dience to the command of their heavenly Father, commenced a general  plan of emigration to the land of Zion. They were few in number—  generally poor, and had every opposition to encounter, both from a  want of means and from the enemies of truth. who circulated every  falsehood calculated to hinder or discourage them. Newspapers and  tracts were put in circulation, sermons and public speeches were  delivered in abundance, to warn the people that was a  barren waste on the sea shore,— that it was a wild and uninhabited  swamp,— that it was full of savages, wild beasts and serpents,— that all the  English Saints who should go there would be immediately sold for slaves  by the leaders of the church,— that there was nothing to eat— no water, and  no way possible to obtain a living— that all who went there would  have their money taken from them, and themselves imprisoned, &c.
But notwithstanding all these things thousands have emigrated  from this country, and now find themselves comfortably situated, and in  the enjoyment of the comforts of life, and in the midst of society where  God is worshipped in the spirit of truth and union, and where nearly all  are agreed in religious principles. They all find plenty of employment  and good wages, while the expense of living is about one eight of what it  costs in this country. For instance— beef and pork costs about one  penny per lb.; flour from 2s to 3s. for forty pounds; and Indian meal [p. 56]
1842 Jan 29 countries, for the strictest investigation. The Manufacturers are evidently beginning to be jealous of the mechanics and workmen emigrating with a people having so systematic an organization as the Latter Day Saints display in their arrangements in this town. I remain. Yours &c.

Addenda • 1 February 1842

Feb 1 The following article is from the Millennial Star of this date.
Emigration
Page 1273 In the midst of the general distress which prevails in this country on account of want of employment, the high price of provisions, the oppression, priestcraft, and iniquity of the land, it is pleasing to the household of faith to contemplate a reserved by the Almighty as a sure asylum for the poor and oppressed— a country every way adapted to their wants and conditions— and still more pleasing to think that thousands of the Saints have already made their escape from this country and all its abuses and distress, and that they have found a home, whereby persevering industry they may enjoy all the blessings of liberty, peace, and plenty.
It is not yet two years since the Saints in England, in obedience to the command of their heavenly Father, commenced a general plan of emigration to the land of Zion. They were few in number— generally poor, and had every opposition to encounter, both from a want of means and from the enemies of truth. who circulated every falsehood calculated to hinder or discourage them. Newspapers and tracts were put in circulation, sermons and public speeches were delivered in abundance, to warn the people that was a barren waste on the sea shore,— that it was a wild and uninhabited swamp,— that it was full of savages, wild beasts and serpents,— that all the English Saints who should go there would be immediately sold for slaves by the leaders of the church,— that there was nothing to eat— no water, and no way possible to obtain a living— that all who went there would have their money taken from them, and themselves imprisoned, &c.
But notwithstanding all these things thousands have emigrated from this country, and now find themselves comfortably situated, and in the enjoyment of the comforts of life, and in the midst of society where God is worshipped in the spirit of truth and union, and where nearly all are agreed in religious principles. They all find plenty of employment and good wages, while the expense of living is about one eight of what it costs in this country. For instance— beef and pork costs about one penny per lb.; flour from 2s to 3s. for forty pounds; and Indian meal [p. 56]
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