History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 59
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<1842  February 1> Office, 47, Oxford Street, Manchester.
We do not wish to confine the benefit of our emigration plan  to the Saints, but are willing to grant all industrious, honest, and  well disposed persons who may apply to us the same information  and assistance as emigrants to the western , there being abun dant room for more than a hundred millions of inhabitants
Addenda • 3 February 1842
<" 3> took the superintendence of the Printing  <Page 1273> Office, and the Editorial department of the Times and  Seasons: who commenced by taking an inventory of the establishment  this day.
Addenda • 17 February 1842
<" 17>
Hanley, Stafford Co. Eng.
Feb 17th 1842.
Prest J. Smith, The work in which we are engaged  <Page 1274> rolls on in this land, and in spite of all its enemies,——  —— moves onward in majesty and  power; there are many who devote all their time and talent in  endeavoring to overthrow it; but I discover they can “do nothing  against the truth; but for it.” Many tracts have been published  against us, containing all manner of lies, but in the end good  will be the result. “He that knoweth God, heareth us.” Some of the  tools of Satan are doing more in spreading the truth than we are  able to do; one in particular, a Mr Brindley, is publishing a  periodical shewing the errors and blasphemies of Mormonism,  and in order to do this he publishes many of the revelations of God  given to us; and, through this means, the testimony is visiting  the mansions of the high and mighty ones— the Reverends,  Right Reverends, and all the noble champions of sectarians receive  them as a precious morsel; and they are read with much interest;  whereas, if we had sent them, they would have been spurned from  their dwellings, and would not have been considered worth reading.  The state of this country is very awful, and is, according to prospects  on the eve of a mighty revolution; all confidence is gone between  master and man, and men are afraid of each other, peace is  fast removing from this land; in the course of the last few days,  in many parts of this isle, they have been burning the effigy of <the> great  men of this nation— poverty, distress, and starvation abound  on every hand. The groans, and tears, and wretchedness of the  thousands of the people is enough to rend the hearts of demons;  many of the saints are suffering much through hunger and [p. 59]
1842 February 1 Office, 47, Oxford Street, Manchester.
We do not wish to confine the benefit of our emigration plan to the Saints, but are willing to grant all industrious, honest, and well disposed persons who may apply to us the same information and assistance as emigrants to the western , there being abundant room for more than a hundred millions of inhabitants
Addenda • 3 February 1842
" 3 took the superintendence of the Printing Page 1273 Office, and the Editorial department of the Times and Seasons: who commenced by taking an inventory of the establishment this day.
Addenda • 17 February 1842
" 17
Hanley, Stafford Co. Eng.
Feb 17th 1842.
Prest J. Smith, The work in which we are engaged Page 1274 rolls on in this land, and in spite of all its enemies,—— —— moves onward in majesty and power; there are many who devote all their time and talent in endeavoring to overthrow it; but I discover they can “do nothing against the truth; but for it.” Many tracts have been published against us, containing all manner of lies, but in the end good will be the result. “He that knoweth God, heareth us.” Some of the tools of Satan are doing more in spreading the truth than we are able to do; one in particular, a Mr Brindley, is publishing a periodical shewing the errors and blasphemies of Mormonism, and in order to do this he publishes many of the revelations of God given to us; and, through this means, the testimony is visiting the mansions of the high and mighty ones— the Reverends, Right Reverends, and all the noble champions of sectarians receive them as a precious morsel; and they are read with much interest; whereas, if we had sent them, they would have been spurned from their dwellings, and would not have been considered worth reading. The state of this country is very awful, and is, according to prospects on the eve of a mighty revolution; all confidence is gone between master and man, and men are afraid of each other, peace is fast removing from this land; in the course of the last few days, in many parts of this isle, they have been burning the effigy of the great men of this nation— poverty, distress, and starvation abound on every hand. The groans, and tears, and wretchedness of the thousands of the people is enough to rend the hearts of demons; many of the saints are suffering much through hunger and [p. 59]
Page 59