History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<1842  February 17> nakedness; many with large families can scarcely get  bread and water enough to hold the spirit in the tabernacle;  many—— very many, are out of employment;  and cannot get work to do, and others that do work hard fourteen  or fifteen hours per day, can scarcely earn enough to enable them  to live upon the earth. Surely there is need of deliverance in  Zion, and I am ready to exclaim thanks be to thy name O Lord,  for remembering thy covenants! and that the “set time to favor  Zion has come,” and that he has chosen the west for a refuge for  his people.
Wishing you all success I remain, Yours in the New  and Everlasting Covenant.
Alfred Cordon.
Addenda • 4 March 1842
<March 4> Attended City Council, and moved “That when pro perty is sold at Sheriff’s, Marshal’s or Constable’s sale under the  <Page 1286.> ordinances of this , the persons having their property sold shall  have the privilege of redeeming the same, by paying the principal  cost, and fifteen per cent on principal, with cost and charges  within thirty days after sale”
Addenda • 9 March 1842
“Dear Sir, I yesterday had the pleasure of receiving your  letter of Feb. 10— am much pleased that you have effected a sale  <Page 1287.> and are so soon to be with us &c.
I have purchased the lands you desired, and will use  my influence to have the improvements made which you wish. Bro  Weiler received your letter and says he will do what he can, to have  all done.
The eight hundred dollars for the and , I wish you to bring in goods, for which I will give you  stock and credit, as soon as received.
I wish you to invest as much money as you possibly  can, in goods, to bring here, and I will purchase them of you when  you come, if we can agree on terms; or you can have my new brick   to rent. I wish the business kept up by some one, in the building  as it is a very fine house, and cost me a handsome amount to build  it. Some eight or ten thousand dollars worth of goods would be of  great advantage to this place: therefore, if you or some of the brethren  would bring them on. I have no doubt but that I can arrange  for them in some way to your, or their, advantage.
As to money matters here, the State Bank is down, and we  cannot tell you what bank would be safe a month hence. I would [p. 60]
1842 February 17 nakedness; many with large families can scarcely get bread and water enough to hold the spirit in the tabernacle; many—— very many, are out of employ; and cannot get work to do, and others that do work hard fourteen or fifteen hours per day, can scarcely earn enough to enable them to live upon the earth. Surely there is need of deliverance in Zion, and I am ready to exclaim thanks be to thy name O Lord, for remembering thy covenants! and that the “set time to favor Zion has come,” and that he has chosen the west for a refuge for his people.
Wishing you all success I remain, Yours in the New and Everlasting Covenant.
Alfred Cordon.
Addenda • 4 March 1842
March 4 Attended City Council, and moved “That when property is sold at Sheriff’s, Marshal’s or Constable’s sale under the Page 1286. ordinances of this , the persons having their property sold shall have the privilege of redeeming the same, by paying the principal cost, and fifteen per cent on principal, with cost and charges within thirty days after sale”
Addenda • 9 March 1842
“Dear Sir, I yesterday had the pleasure of receiving your letter of Feb. 10— am much pleased that you have effected a sale Page 1287. and are so soon to be with us &c.
I have purchased the lands you desired, and will use my influence to have the improvements made which you wish. Bro Weiler received your letter and says he will do what he can, to have all done.
The eight hundred dollars for the and , I wish you to bring in goods, for which I will give you stock and credit, as soon as received.
I wish you to invest as much money as you possibly can, in goods, to bring here, and I will purchase them of you when you come, if we can agree on terms; or you can have my new brick to rent. I wish the business kept up by some one, in the building as it is a very fine house, and cost me a handsome amount to build it. Some eight or ten thousand dollars worth of goods would be of great advantage to this place: therefore, if you or some of the brethren would bring them on. I have no doubt but that I can arrange for them in some way to your, or their, advantage.
As to money matters here, the State Bank is down, and we cannot tell you what bank would be safe a month hence. I would [p. 60]
Page 60