History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1645
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<July 1> engaged in threatening the citizens with death if they did not leave their homes and go out of the within a very short time; the time not precisely recollected; but I think it was the next day by ten o’clock, but of this I am not certain. He said they were setting fire to the prairies, in view of burning houses and desolating farms, that they [HC 3:457] had set fire to a wagon loaded with goods and they were all consumed; that they had also set fire to a house, and when he left, it was burning down. Such was the situation of affairs at at that time, that could not spare any of his forces, as an attack was hourly expected at . The messenger went off, and I heard no more about it, till sometime the night following, when I was awakened from sleep by the voice of some man apparently giving command to a military body, being somewhat unwell I did not get up. Sometime after I got up in the morning, the Sheriff of the stopped at the door, and said that , had had a battle with the mob last night at , and that several were killed and a number wounded; that was among the number of the wounded, and his wound supposed to be mortal. After I had taken breakfast another gentleman called, giving me the same account, and asked me if I would not take my horse and ride out with him and see what was done. I agreed to do so, and we started and after going some three or four miles, met a company coming into , we turned and went back with them.
This mob proved to be that, headed by the Reverend , a methodist preacher, and the battle was called the Bogard Battle. After this battle there was a short season of quiet, the mobs disappeared, and the Militia returned to ; though they were not discharged, but remained under orders until it should be known how the matter would turn. In the space of a few days, it was said that a large body of armed men were entering the south part of . The county court ordered the military to go and enquire what was their object, in thus coming into the county without permission. The military started as commanded, and little or no information was received at about their movements until late the next afternoon, when a large army was descried making their way towards . being an elevated situation, the army was discovered while a number of miles from the place. Their object was entirely unknown to the citizens as far as I had any knowledge on the subject; and every man I heard speak of their object, expressed as great ignorance as myself.— They reached a small stream on the South side of the , which was studded with timber on its banks and for perhaps from half a mile to a mile on the South side of the stream, an hour before sundown. There the main body halted, and soon after a detachment under the command of , marched towards the town in line of battle. This body was preceded, probably three fourths of a mile in advance of them, by a man carrying a white flag, who ap[HC 3:458]proached within a few rods of the eastern boundary of the , and demanded three persons, who were in the town, to be sent to their camp, after which the whole town, he said would be massacred. When the persons who were inquired for were informed, they refused to go, determined to share the common fate of the citizens. One of those persons did not belong to the “Church of Latter day Saints.” His name is , a merchant in that .
The white flag returned to the camp. To the force of , was the small force of militia, under , opposed. Who also marched in line of battle to the Southern line of the . The whole force of did not [p. 1645]
July 1 engaged in threatening the citizens with death if they did not leave their homes and go out of the within a very short time; the time not precisely recollected; but I think it was the next day by ten o’clock, but of this I am not certain. He said they were setting fire to the prairies, in view of burning houses and desolating farms, that they [HC 3:457] had set fire to a wagon loaded with goods and they were all consumed; that they had also set fire to a house, and when he left, it was burning down. Such was the situation of affairs at at that time, that could not spare any of his forces, as an attack was hourly expected at . The messenger went off, and I heard no more about it, till sometime the night following, when I was awakened from sleep by the voice of some man apparently giving command to a military body, being somewhat unwell I did not get up. Sometime after I got up in the morning, the Sheriff of the stopped at the door, and said that , had had a battle with the mob last night at , and that several were killed and a number wounded; that was among the number of the wounded, and his wound supposed to be mortal. After I had taken breakfast another gentleman called, giving me the same account, and asked me if I would not take my horse and ride out with him and see what was done. I agreed to do so, and we started and after going some three or four miles, met a company coming into , we turned and went back with them.
This mob proved to be that, headed by the Reverend , a methodist preacher, and the battle was called the Bogard Battle. After this battle there was a short season of quiet, the mobs disappeared, and the Militia returned to ; though they were not discharged, but remained under orders until it should be known how the matter would turn. In the space of a few days, it was said that a large body of armed men were entering the south part of . The county court ordered the military to go and enquire what was their object, in thus coming into the county without permission. The military started as commanded, and little or no information was received at about their movements until late the next afternoon, when a large army was descried making their way towards . being an elevated situation, the army was discovered while a number of miles from the place. Their object was entirely unknown to the citizens as far as I had any knowledge on the subject; and every man I heard speak of their object, expressed as great ignorance as myself.— They reached a small stream on the South side of the , which was studded with timber on its banks and for perhaps from half a mile to a mile on the South side of the stream, an hour before sundown. There the main body halted, and soon after a detachment under the command of , marched towards the town in line of battle. This body was preceded, probably three fourths of a mile in advance of them, by a man carrying a white flag, who ap[HC 3:458]proached within a few rods of the eastern boundary of the , and demanded three persons, who were in the town, to be sent to their camp, after which the whole town, he said would be massacred. When the persons who were inquired for were informed, they refused to go, determined to share the common fate of the citizens. One of those persons did not belong to the “Church of Latter day Saints.” His name is , a merchant in that .
The white flag returned to the camp. To the force of , was the small force of militia, under , opposed. Who also marched in line of battle to the Southern line of the . The whole force of did not [p. 1645]
Page 1645