History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1647
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<July 1>
This was probably the reason why they did not carry the decision of the Court Martial into effect. It was finally agreed that we should be carried into , accordingly on the third day after our arrest the army was all paraded, we were put into wagons and taken into the — our families having heard that we were to be brought to town that morning to be shot. When we arrived a scene ensued such as might be expected, under the circumstances. I was permitted to go alone with my family into the house, there I found my family so completely plundered of all kinds of food that they had nothing to eat but parched corn which they ground with a hand mill, and thus were they sustaining life. I soon pacified my family and allayed their feelings by assuring them that the ruffians dare not kill me. I gave them strong assurances that they dare not do it, and that I would return to them again. After this interview I took my leave of them, and returned to the wagon got in and we were all started off for . Before we reached the a man came riding along the line apparently in great haste. I did not know his business. When we got to the river came to me and told me that he wanted us to [HC 3:460] hurry as had arrived from with a message from Gen. ordering him to return with us to as he was there with a large army, he said he would not comply with the demand, but did not know but might send an army to take us by force. We were hurried over the as fast as possible with as many of army as could be sent over at one time and sent hastily on, and thus we were taken to the Shire town of , and put into an old house and a strong guard placed over us, In a day or two they relaxed their severity, we were taken to the best tavern in town and there boarded, and treated with kindness— we were permitted to go and come at our pleasure without any guard. After some days Colonel arrived from ’s army with a demand to have us taken to Ray County. It was difficult to get a guard to go with us, indeed, we solicited them to send one with us, and finally got a few men to go and we started; after we had crossed the on our way to , we met a number of very rough looking fellows, and as rough acting as they were looking, they threatened our lives.— We solicited our guard to send to for a stronger force to guard us there, as we considered our lives in danger. met us with a strong force and conducted us to where we were put in close confinement.
One thing I will here mention which I forgot— while we were at I was introduced to , a lawyer of some note in the country. In speaking on the subject of our arrest and being torn from our families, said he presumed it was another scrape. He said the Mormons had been driven from that county and that without any offence on their part. He said he knew all about it, they were driven off because the people feared their political influence. And what was said about against the Mormons was only to justify the mob in the eyes of the world for the course they had taken. He said this was another scrape of the same kind.
This , by his own confession was one of the principal leaders in the mob.
After this digression I will resume— The same day that we arrived at , came into the place where we were, with a number of armed men, who immediately on entering the room cocked their guns, another followed with chains in his hands, and we were ordered to be chained all together— a strong guard was placed in and round the house, and thus we were secured. The next day came [p. 1647]
July 1
This was probably the reason why they did not carry the decision of the Court Martial into effect. It was finally agreed that we should be carried into , accordingly on the third day after our arrest the army was all paraded, we were put into wagons and taken into the — our families having heard that we were to be brought to town that morning to be shot. When we arrived a scene ensued such as might be expected, under the circumstances. I was permitted to go alone with my family into the house, there I found my family so completely plundered of all kinds of food that they had nothing to eat but parched corn which they ground with a hand mill, and thus were they sustaining life. I soon pacified my family and allayed their feelings by assuring them that the ruffians dare not kill me. I gave them strong assurances that they dare not do it, and that I would return to them again. After this interview I took my leave of them, and returned to the wagon got in and we were all started off for . Before we reached the a man came riding along the line apparently in great haste. I did not know his business. When we got to the river came to me and told me that he wanted us to [HC 3:460] hurry as had arrived from with a message from Gen. ordering him to return with us to as he was there with a large army, he said he would not comply with the demand, but did not know but might send an army to take us by force. We were hurried over the as fast as possible with as many of ’army as could be sent over at one time and sent hastily on, and thus we were taken to the Shire town of , and put into an old house and a strong guard placed over us, In a day or two they relaxed their severity, we were taken to the best tavern in town and there boarded, and treated with kindness— we were permitted to go and come at our pleasure without any guard. After some days Colonel arrived from ’s army with a demand to have us taken to Ray County. It was difficult to get a guard to go with us, indeed, we solicited them to send one with us, and finally got a few men to go and we started; after we had crossed the on our way to , we met a number of very rough looking fellows, and as rough acting as they were looking, they threatened our lives.— We solicited our guard to send to for a stronger force to guard us there, as we considered our lives in danger. met us with a strong force and conducted us to where we were put in close confinement.
One thing I will here mention which I forgot— while we were at I was introduced to , a lawyer of some note in the country. In speaking on the subject of our arrest and being torn from our families, said he presumed it was another scrape. He said the Mormons had been driven from that county and that without any offence on their part. He said he knew all about it, they were driven off because the people feared their political influence. And what was said against the Mormons was only to justify the mob in the eyes of the world for the course they had taken. He said this was another scrape of the same kind.
This , by his own confession was one of the principal leaders in the mob.
After this digression I will resume— The same day that we arrived at , came into the place where we were, with a number of armed men, who immediately on entering the room cocked their guns, another followed with chains in his hands, and we were ordered to be chained all together— a strong guard was placed in and round the house, and thus we were secured. The next day came [p. 1647]
Page 1647