History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 179
image
<June 27>
“Permit , the private secretary of Joseph Smith, to be with him if he desires it, and to pass and repass the guard.
Commander in Chief”
“June 27th 1844”
said he could not get one for himself.
met in the Street, and informed him that Joseph wanted to see him. [HC 6:612]
11.30. arrived at the jail, and read a letter from .
Joseph, and tried to get past the guard, but they persisted in refusing to admit him.
12½ noon. Joseph wrote for of to come up on Saturday as his attorney, as follows:—
Jail, June 27th 1844
, Sir,
Myself and brother are in Jail on charge of Treason,— to come up for examination on Saturday morning 29th, inst, and we request your professional services at that time, on our defence, without fail.
Most respectfully, Your Servt.
Joseph Smith.
“P. S. There is no cause of action, for we have not been guilty of any crime; neither is there any just cause of suspicion against us, but certain circumstances make your attendance very necessary
J. S.”
took the letter, and left the jail. He handed it to with directions to take it to forthwith. The guard being aware of the letter told the mob that “old Joe” had sent orders to raise the Nauvoo Legion to come and rescue him. The mob gathered around , and demanded the letter; some of them wanted to take it <from him>, by force, and said that should not get out of alive, as a dozen men had started off with their rifles to waylay him in the woods. Having previously ordered his horse, took advantage of their disagreements, and started off at full speed. He by mistake took the road, and so avoided the men who were lying in wait for him. When he emerged on to the prairie, he saw the and his [HC 6:613] posse, whereupon he left the road for the road. -[]-
Dr Southwick called at the jail. Joseph gave him a note to or requesting them to furnish him with a pass.
1¼ P. M. Joseph, and dined in their room. and dined below.
1½ P. M. was taken sick, when Joseph said, “, as you have a pass from the to go in and out of the jail, go and get a pipe and some tobacco to settle his stomach,” and went out for them; when he had got the pipe and tobacco, and was returning to jail, a man by the name of Stewart called out, “Old man, [p. 179]
June 27
“Permit , the private secretary of Joseph Smith, to be with him if he desires it, and to pass and repass the guard.
Commander in Chief”
“June 27th 1844”
said he could not get one for himself.
met in the Street, and informed him that Joseph wanted to see him. [HC 6:612]
11.30. arrived at the jail, and read a letter from .
Joseph, and tried to get past the guard, but they persisted in refusing to admit him.
12½ noon. Joseph wrote for of to come up on Saturday as his attorney, as follows:—
Jail, June 27th 1844
, Sir,
Myself and brother are in Jail on charge of Treason,— to come up for examination on Saturday morning 29th, inst, and we request your professional services at that time, on our defence, without fail.
Most respectfully, Your Servt.
Joseph Smith.
“P. S. There is no cause of action, for we have not been guilty of any crime; neither is there any just cause of suspicion against us, but certain circumstances make your attendance very necessary
J. S.”
took the letter, and left the jail. He handed it to with directions to take it to forthwith. The guard being aware of the letter told the mob that “old Joe” had sent orders to raise the Nauvoo Legion to come and rescue him. The mob gathered around , and demanded the letter; some of them wanted to take it from him, by force, and said that should not get out of alive, as a dozen men had started off with their rifles to waylay him in the woods. Having previously ordered his horse, took advantage of their disagreements, and started off at full speed. He by mistake took the road, and so avoided the men who were lying in wait for him. When he emerged on to the prairie, he saw the and his [HC 6:613] posse, whereupon he left the road for the road. -[]-
Dr Southwick called at the jail. Joseph gave him a note to or requesting them to furnish him with a pass.
1¼ P. M. Joseph, and dined in their room. and dined below.
1½ P. M. was taken sick, when Joseph said, “, as you have a pass from the to go in and out of the jail, go and get a pipe and some tobacco to settle his stomach,” and went out for them; when he had got the pipe and tobacco, and was returning to jail, a man by the name of Stewart called out, “Old man, [p. 179]
Page 179