History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​May 17th.​> () asserting that the Mobocracy— the decree, (the woman and babe destroyer) and the expatriating or exterminating feat from , was not only just but that he was clad with proof— with legal justification, and the Mormons merited all and more than they had received of viralence and brutality. If American jurisprudence be on these decisions, and by the men whom democracy sustained, the deeds of valor which again will place them at the head of <​our​> affairs, the strands are broken, the links have sprung, and the anchor fangs refused to hold; may we now say that in 1844, Joseph Smith the proclaimer of Jefferson Democracy, of Free trade and Sailors rights, and protection of Person and Property, with us stands first to the Baltimore Convention, (and if his want of success in the nomination exists instruct our delegates to say ), and like men stand firm— to a man vi voca speak out— and herald the tidings North, South, East, and West, admitting that
“None but mean spirits dread the face of care,
And none but cowards, life’s afflictions bear;
All dastard spirits sink at distant war,
And tremble as it threatens from afar;
But rich or poor, true minds preserve their weight,
And if exalted or debased are great.”’
Cruden.
Synopsis of the remarks of Hon. :—
:
‘I cannot leave this subject and do justice to my own feelings, and the character of Gen. Smith, without giving a short history of the first persecution that came upon him in the counties of and , in the State of , commenced by that class of people calling themselves christians.
‘The first acquaintance I had with Gen. Smith was about the year 1823. He came into my neighborhood, being then about eighteen years of age, and resided there two years; during which time I became intimately acquainted with him. I do know that his character was irreproachable; that he was well known for truth and uprightness; that he moved in the first circles of community, and he was often spoken of as a young man of intelligence and good morals, and possessing a mind susceptible of the highest intellectual attainments.
‘I early discovered that his mind was constantly in search of truth, expressing an anxious desire to know the will of God concerning his children here below, often speaking of those things which professed christians believe in. I have often observed to my best informed friends, [HC 6:392] (those that were free from superstition and bigotry), that I thought Joseph was predestinated by his God from all eternity to be an instrument in the hands of the great dispenser of all good to do a great work; what it was I knew not. After living in that neighborhood about three years, enjoying the good feelings of his acquaintances as a worthy youth, he told his particular friends that he had had a revelation from God to go to the west about eighty miles to his ’s, in which neighborhood he should find hid in the earth an old history, written on golden plates, which would give great light and knowledge concerning the will of God towards his people in this generation, unfolding the destiny of all nations, kindreds, and tongues; he said that he distinctly heard the voice of him that spoke. , one of the father’s of your church, a worthy man, and my intimate friend, went with him. When I reflect upon our former friendship, , and upon the scenes that he has passed through through in consequence of mal-administration, mobocracy, and cruelty, I feel to lift [p. 46]
May 17th. () asserting that the Mobocracy— the decree, (the woman and babe destroyer) and the expatriating or exterminating feat from , was not only just but that he was clad with proof— with legal justification, and the Mormons merited all and more than they had received of viralence and brutality. If American jurisprudence be on these decisions, and by the men whom democracy sustained, the deeds of valor which again will place them at the head of our affairs, the strands are broken, the links have sprung, and the anchor fangs refused to hold; may we now say that in 1844, Joseph Smith the proclaimer of Jefferson Democracy, of Free trade and Sailors rights, and protection of Person and Property, with us stands first to the Baltimore Convention, (and if his want of success in the nomination exists instruct our delegates to say ), and like men stand firm— to a man vi voca speak out— and herald the tidings North, South, East, and West, admitting that
“None but mean spirits dread the face of care,
And none but cowards, life’s afflictions bear;
All dastard spirits sink at distant war,
And tremble as it threatens from afar;
But rich or poor, true minds preserve their weight,
And if exalted or debased are great.”’
Cruden.
Synopsis of the remarks of Hon. :—
:
‘I cannot leave this subject and do justice to my own feelings, and the character of Gen. Smith, without giving a short history of the first persecution that came upon him in the counties of and , in the State of , commenced by that class of people calling themselves christians.
‘The first acquaintance I had with Gen. Smith was about the year 1823. He came into my neighborhood, being then about eighteen years of age, and resided there two years; during which time I became intimately acquainted with him. I do know that his character was irreproachable; that he was well known for truth and uprightness; that he moved in the first circles of community, and he was often spoken of as a young man of intelligence and good morals, and possessing a mind susceptible of the highest intellectual attainments.
‘I early discovered that his mind was constantly in search of truth, expressing an anxious desire to know the will of God concerning his children here below, often speaking of those things which professed christians believe in. I have often observed to my best informed friends, [HC 6:392] (those that were free from superstition and bigotry), that I thought Joseph was predestinated by his God from all eternity to be an instrument in the hands of the great dispenser of all good to do a great work; what it was I knew not. After living in that neighborhood about three years, enjoying the good feelings of his acquaintances as a worthy youth, he told his particular friends that he had had a revelation from God to go to the west about eighty miles to his ’s, in which neighborhood he should find hid in the earth an old history, written on golden plates, which would give great light and knowledge concerning the will of God towards his people in this generation, unfolding the destiny of all nations, kindreds, and tongues; he said that he distinctly heard the voice of him that spoke. , one of the father’s of your church, a worthy man, and my intimate friend, went with him. When I reflect upon our former friendship, , and upon the scenes that he has passed through in consequence of mal-administration, mobocracy, and cruelty, I feel to lift [p. 46]
Page 46