History, circa 1841, draft [Draft 3]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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and zeal. were lost in a strife of words. and contest  of opinions. During this excitement, I made it an  object of much study and reflection. Although  my feelings were deeply interested. still I kept  myself aloof from all parties. In process  of time, however. I became partial, to the  Mithodist<s> Chursociety I and I felt some desire  to unite <with> them. But the confusion and strife ren dered it impossible. for a person of my age. and  little acqu of my limited acquaintance with  men and things. to determine, who were right. &  who wrong. While in this situation. I often said  to myself. what is to be done. who <which> of all these  are right. or are they all wrong together. If  any of them are right. which is it. and how shall  I know it. While in this state of perplexity. I  was one day reading the Epistle of St. James. 1st  chapter. fifth ver. where. I found the following the  words. If any of you lack wisdom. let him  ask of God. that giveth to all men liberally.  and upbraideth not. and it shall be given him.
Never did any passage of scripture. make  a deeper impression. on the heart of man than  This than was made on mine. by this. Knowing  as I did. that I needed wisdom from God. &  unless I obtained it. I could not <detirmne> assertain  which were right. And the teachers of the diff erent sects, interpreted this passage of scripture. so  as <to> destroy all confidence. in settling the question  by an appeal to the Bible. this <thus> compelled <compelling> me  to conclude that I must remain in darkness.  or do as James directs. which is to “ask of  God”. At length I came to the conclusion, to ask  of him for wisdom, believing that he “that giveth  giveth to all men”. liberally and upbraideth not.  would not refuse to verify his promise to me, [p. 2]
and zeal. were lost in a strife of words. and contest of opinions. During this excitement, I made it an object of much study and reflection. Although my feelings were deeply interested. still I kept myself aloof from all parties. In process of time, however. I became partial, to the Mithodists and I felt some desire to unite with them. But the confusion and strife rendered it impossible. for a person of my age. and limited acquaintance with men and things. to determine, who were right. & who wrong. While in this situation. I often said to myself. what is to be done. which of all these are right. or are they all wrong . If any of them are right. which is it. and how shall I know it. While in this state of perplexity. I was one day reading the Epistle of St. James. 1st chapter. fifth ver. where. I found the following words. If any of you lack wisdom. let him ask of God. that giveth to all men liberally. and upbraideth not. and it shall be given him.
Never did any passage of scripture. make a deeper impression. on the heart of man than was made on mine. by this. Knowing as I did. that I needed wisdom from God. & unless I obtained it. I could not detirmne which were right. And the teachers of the different sects, interpreted this passage . so as to destroy all confidence. in settling the question by an appeal to the Bible. thus compelling me to conclude that I must remain in darkness. or do as James directs. which is to “ask of God”. At length I came to the conclusion, to ask of him for wisdom, believing that he “that giveth to all men”. liberally and upbraideth not. would not refuse to verify his promise to me, [p. 2]
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