John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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to let it be known, that the church might be gathered in. But this re gulation was not attended to, for the church got crazy to go up to  Zion, as it was then called. The rich were afraid to send up their  money to purchase lands, and the poor crowded up in numbers,  without having any places provided, contrary to the advice of the   and others, until the old citizens began to be highly displeased.  They saw their filling up with emigrants, principally poor.  They disliked their religion, and saw also, that if let alone. they would  in a short time become a majority, and, of course, rule the .  The church kept increasing, and the old citizens became more and  more dissatisfied, and from time to time offered to sell their farms and  possessions, but the Mormons, though desirous, were too poor to pur chase them.
The feelings of the people became greatly exasperated, in conse quence of the many falsehoods and evil reports that were in constant  circulation against the church.
Thus matters grew worse and worse, until the people arose in  their fury. On the 20th day of July, 1833, the citizens met at the  , in , and appointed a committee, who called  upon six or seven of the leading Mormons, and required them to shut  up all their work-shops, their , and their , and agree  to leave the . The Mormons required time to give them an  answer, but they would grant only fifteen minutes. The Mormons then  refused to comply with their proposals, and the committee then return ed to the , where the people were assembled, and related  to them the answer of the Mormons. They then took a vote to de molish the , which they did immediately, and tarred and  feathered the and two or three others, and appointed the 23d to  meet again and carry on the work of destruction. The day arrived  and the people met, several hundred in number, and plainly manifested  a full determination to carry on the work of destruction: some four  or five of the leading Mormons offered their lives if they would spare  the church, but they answered “no, every man should answer for his  own life, or leave the .”
The Mormons agreed to leave, and this appeased their wrath for  that time. A part was to leave in January, and a part in the Spring.  This agreement having been made in duress, the Mormons considered  it illegal, and not binding, and supposed that the , or authori ties, would protect them, if applied to, and not suffer them to be driven  off in that manner.
Here, let me remark, that up to this time the Mormons had not so  much as lifted a finger, even in their own defence, so tenacious were  they for the precepts of the gospel,—“turn the other cheek.”
Between two and three months passed off in peace, when, towards  the last of October, a petition was drawn up and circulated in the  church, praying the for protection; but he said we must ap peal to the civil law for redress. This we tried, but found it of no use  for as soon as the people found out that we had petitioned the  for protection, and that we were about to appeal to the law for re dress, they became very angry, and again commenced hostilities. [p. 19]
to let it be known, that the church might be gathered in. But this regulation was not attended to, for the church got crazy to go up to Zion, as it was then called. The rich were afraid to send up their money to purchase lands, and the poor crowded up in numbers, without having any places provided, contrary to the advice of the and others, until the old citizens began to be highly displeased. They saw their filling up with emigrants, principally poor. They disliked their religion, and saw also, that if let alone. they would in a short time become a majority, and, of course, rule the . The church kept increasing, and the old citizens became more and more dissatisfied, and from time to time offered to sell their farms and possessions, but the Mormons, though desirous, were too poor to purchase them.
The feelings of the people became greatly exasperated, in consequence of the many falsehoods and evil reports that were in constant circulation against the church.
Thus matters grew worse and worse, until the people arose in their fury. On the 20th day of July, 1833, the citizens met at the , in , and appointed a committee, who called upon six or seven of the leading Mormons, and required them to shut up all their work-shops, their , and their , and agree to leave the . The Mormons required time to give them an answer, but they would grant only fifteen minutes. The Mormons then refused to comply with their proposals, and the committee then returned to the , where the people were assembled, and related to them the answer of the Mormons. They then took a vote to demolish the , which they did immediately, and tarred and feathered the and two or three others, and appointed the 23d to meet again and carry on the work of destruction. The day arrived and the people met, several hundred in number, and plainly manifested a full determination to carry on the work of destruction: some four or five of the leading Mormons offered their lives if they would spare the church, but they answered “no, every man should answer for his own life, or leave the .”
The Mormons agreed to leave, and this appeased their wrath for that time. A part was to leave in January, and a part in the Spring. This agreement having been made in duress, the Mormons considered it illegal, and not binding, and supposed that the , or authorities, would protect them, if applied to, and not suffer them to be driven off in that manner.
Here, let me remark, that up to this time the Mormons had not so much as lifted a finger, even in their own defence, so tenacious were they for the precepts of the gospel,—“turn the other cheek.”
Between two and three months passed off in peace, when, towards the last of October, a petition was drawn up and circulated in the church, praying the for protection; but he said we must appeal to the civil law for redress. This we tried, but found it of no use for as soon as the people found out that we had petitioned the for protection, and that we were about to appeal to the law for redress, they became very angry, and again commenced hostilities. [p. 19]
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