John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 20
image
The Mormons then began to prepare for self-defence, but were badly  armed. The citizens would collect together, and by night commit de predations on the Mormons, by pulling down their houses, whipping  the men, &c., until some time about the fourth of November, 1833, a  conflict took place, in which three or four persons were killed, and  others wounded. This took place above Blue, eight or nine miles  from , and the news reached a little after  dark; at which time six or eight of the Mormons were undergoing a  sham trial, under a pretence of law; but this news produced such con fusion in the , and the people became so angry, that the  court was obliged to shut up the prisoners in the gaol, to keep them  from being murdered. The people continued to gather from different  parts of the country, and such was the wrath and determination mani fested, that before light the next morning, the Mormon leaders agreed  for themselves and the church, to leave the . , who lived above Blue, eight or ten miles distant, on hearing  that several Mormons were in gaol without just cause, and supposing  they intended to take their lives, gathered up about one hundred and  fifty men, partly armed, and marched to ; but on learn ing that the Mormons had agreed to leave the , they conceded  to the same, and gave up their arms,—fifty-two guns, a pistol and a  sword,—which and others faithfully agreed to deliver up,  as soon as they had left the ; but this they afterwards refused to  do, although required to do so, by a written order from the ,  and the Mormons have never received the guns nor an equivalent for  them to this day
The Mormons all left in the course of three or four  weeks. Some went to ; some to the eastward; but  the major part went to , where they were received in a  hospitable manner. They were not suffered to return to , even to settle up their business.
During all these difficulties the Mormons were accused of many  crimes. This, of course, was necessary for an excuse; but the people  of well know, that up to that time, the Mormons had not been  guilty of crime, nor done any thing whereby they could criminate them  by the law: and, in my opinion, the stories originated in hatred towards  the Mormon religion, and the fear entertained of their overrunning  and ruling the .
The people of gave the Mormons employment, and paid them  good wages; and by their industry they made themselves comfortable,  with the exception of some families that found it difficult to get shelter.  The number driven out was about twelve hundred.
Some time in the winter of ’33 and 4, the ordered the  criminal acts of the people to be complained of, and laid before the  grand jury of . For this purpose, he ordered , with his company of Liberty Blues, to guard the witness es over to the trial, which he did, much to the satisfaction of the wit nesses. The also requested the Attorney General to go and  assist; but, after getting there, and seeing the situation of things, and  the spirit of the people, he advised the witnesses to go home, and not [p. 20]
The Mormons then began to prepare for self-defence, but were badly armed. The citizens would collect together, and by night commit depredations on the Mormons, by pulling down their houses, whipping the men, &c., until some time about the fourth of November, 1833, a conflict took place, in which three or four persons were killed, and others wounded. This took place above Blue, eight or nine miles from , and the news reached a little after dark; at which time six or eight of the Mormons were undergoing a sham trial, under a pretence of law; but this news produced such confusion in the , and the people became so angry, that the court was obliged to shut up the prisoners in the gaol, to keep them from being murdered. The people continued to gather from different parts of the country, and such was the wrath and determination manifested, that before light the next morning, the Mormon leaders agreed for themselves and the church, to leave the . , who lived above Blue, eight or ten miles distant, on hearing that several Mormons were in gaol without just cause, and supposing they intended to take their lives, gathered up about one hundred and fifty men, partly armed, and marched to ; but on learning that the Mormons had agreed to leave the , they conceded to the same, and gave up their arms,—fifty-two guns, a pistol and a sword,—which and others faithfully agreed to deliver up, as soon as they had left the ; but this they afterwards refused to do, although required to do so, by a written order from the , and the Mormons have never received the guns nor an equivalent for them to this day
The Mormons all left in the course of three or four weeks. Some went to ; some to the eastward; but the major part went to , where they were received in a hospitable manner. They were not suffered to return to , even to settle up their business.
During all these difficulties the Mormons were accused of many crimes. This, of course, was necessary for an excuse; but the people of well know, that up to that time, the Mormons had not been guilty of crime, nor done any thing whereby they could criminate them by the law: and, in my opinion, the stories originated in hatred towards the Mormon religion, and the fear entertained of their overrunning and ruling the .
The people of gave the Mormons employment, and paid them good wages; and by their industry they made themselves comfortable, with the exception of some families that found it difficult to get shelter. The number driven out was about twelve hundred.
Some time in the winter of ’33 and 4, the ordered the criminal acts of the people to be complained of, and laid before the grand jury of . For this purpose, he ordered , with his company of Liberty Blues, to guard the witnesses over to the trial, which he did, much to the satisfaction of the witnesses. The also requested the Attorney General to go and assist; but, after getting there, and seeing the situation of things, and the spirit of the people, he advised the witnesses to go home, and not [p. 20]
Page 20