John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Each pulpit consisted of four different apartments; the fourth stand ing on a platform raised a suitable height above the floor; the third  stood directly behind and elevated a little above the fourth; the second  in rear of and elevated above the third; and so was the first above  the second. Each of these apartments was just large enough, and  rightly calculated to receive three persons, and the breast-work in  front of each of these three last mentioned, was constituted of three  semi-circles, joining each other, and finished in good style. The  fourth, or lower one, was straight in front, and had a table-leaf at tached to it, that could be raised at pleasure, for the convenience  of administering the sacrament, &c. These pulpits were alike in  each end of the , and one was for the use of the Malchise dec [Melchizedek], or high priesthood, and the other for the Aaronic, or lesser  priesthood. The first, or higher apartment, was occupied by the first  presidency over all the church; the second apartment, by the Presi dent of the high priests, and his two counsellors; the third by  three of the High Priests; and the fourth by the President of the  Elders, and his two counsellors. The highest apartment of the  other pulpit was occupied by the Bishop of the church and his two  counsellors; the next by the President of the priests and his two coun sellors; the third by the President of the teachers and his two coun sellors; and the fourth by the President of the deacons and his two  counsellors. Each of these apartments had curtains hanging from the  ceiling, over head, down to the top of the pulpit, which could be roll ed up or dropped down at pleasure; and, when dropped down, would  completely exclude those within the apartment from the sight of all  others. The room itself was finished with slips and seats, so calcu lated that, by slipping the seats a little, the congregation could change  their faces towards either pulpit they choose, for in some cases the high  priesthood would administer, and in other cases the lesser would.  The room was also divided into four apartments, by means of curtains  hanging from the ceiling, over head, down to the floor, which could  be rolled up at pleasure, so that the room could be used all in one, or  divided into four rooms, and used for different purposes. Thus the  house was constructed to suit and accommodate the different orders of  priesthood and worship peculiar to the church. The first story, or  lower room, was dedicated for divine worship alone. The second  story was finished similar in form to the first, but was designed, whol ly, for instruction, and supplied with tables instead of slips. In the  roof were finished five rooms for the convenience of schools, and for  the different quorums of the church to meet in, &c.
In the winter of 1834 and 5, all the principal elders in Upper  went to . Some of them spent the Summer there, while others  travelled and preached in the eastern States, and some went to the south.  I was appointed to take charge of the finishing of the .
In the fall, and early part of the winter of ’35, the elders gathered  in to , to the number, I should think, of three or four hundred,  who remained there through the winter. Schools were instituted for  the use of the elders and others. Some studied grammar and other  branches: they also employed the celebrated Hebrew teacher, [p. 22]
Each pulpit consisted of four different apartments; the fourth standing on a platform raised a suitable height above the floor; the third stood directly behind and elevated a little above the fourth; the second in rear of and elevated above the third; and so was the first above the second. Each of these apartments was just large enough, and rightly calculated to receive three persons, and the breast-work in front of each of these three last mentioned, was constituted of three semi-circles, joining each other, and finished in good style. The fourth, or lower one, was straight in front, and had a table-leaf attached to it, that could be raised at pleasure, for the convenience of administering the sacrament, &c. These pulpits were alike in each end of the , and one was for the use of the Malchisedec [Melchizedek], or high priesthood, and the other for the Aaronic, or lesser priesthood. The first, or higher apartment, was occupied by the first presidency over all the church; the second apartment, by the President of the high priests, and his two counsellors; the third by three of the High Priests; and the fourth by the President of the Elders, and his two counsellors. The highest apartment of the other pulpit was occupied by the Bishop of the church and his two counsellors; the next by the President of the priests and his two counsellors; the third by the President of the teachers and his two counsellors; and the fourth by the President of the deacons and his two counsellors. Each of these apartments had curtains hanging from the ceiling, over head, down to the top of the pulpit, which could be rolled up or dropped down at pleasure; and, when dropped down, would completely exclude those within the apartment from the sight of all others. The room itself was finished with slips and seats, so calculated that, by slipping the seats a little, the congregation could change their faces towards either pulpit they choose, for in some cases the high priesthood would administer, and in other cases the lesser would. The room was also divided into four apartments, by means of curtains hanging from the ceiling, over head, down to the floor, which could be rolled up at pleasure, so that the room could be used all in one, or divided into four rooms, and used for different purposes. Thus the house was constructed to suit and accommodate the different orders of priesthood and worship peculiar to the church. The first story, or lower room, was dedicated for divine worship alone. The second story was finished similar in form to the first, but was designed, wholly, for instruction, and supplied with tables instead of slips. In the roof were finished five rooms for the convenience of schools, and for the different quorums of the church to meet in, &c.
In the winter of 1834 and 5, all the principal elders in Upper went to . Some of them spent the Summer there, while others travelled and preached in the eastern States, and some went to the south. I was appointed to take charge of the finishing of the .
In the fall, and early part of the winter of ’35, the elders gathered in to , to the number, I should think, of three or four hundred, who remained there through the winter. Schools were instituted for the use of the elders and others. Some studied grammar and other branches: they also employed the celebrated Hebrew teacher, [p. 22]
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