John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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and 7, a difficulty arose between them and the church, on account of their  having entered the town plot and some other lands in their own names;  but, on an investigation of the matter they gave the town plot and some  other lands into the hands of the , as the property of the church.  However, perfect reconciliation of feelings was not restored; but  in the fall of 1837 Smith and , and others, came to  on a visit. A general meeting was called for the church to choose  whether they would have the old presidency rule any longer over  them or not. Their old difficulties were talked over, and so far re conciled, that they still choose to have and their  presidents; but, in the winter following, the old difficulty broke out  again, and the excitement rose so high that they turned them out  of their presidential office, and and two others served  as presidents, pro tempore, until Smith and arrived, and even  until now. When Smith and arrived the church was much  pleased, and supposed that things would be managed right by them,  and they would have better times; but it was not long before the old  feelings began to be stirred up between the church and the dissenters.  Complaints were made to the authorities of the church against them,  upon which they immediately withdrew from the church. The church  in had been doing well, with the exception of these little dif ficulties among themselves, until the first presidency came to the , and began to move things to their own notions. Many of the  church had settled in , and, to all appearance, lived as  peaceably with their neighbors, as people generally do; but not long  after Smith and arrived in , they went to and pitched upon a place to build a town. was al ready on the ground with his family. They laid out a town and be gan to settle it pretty rapidly; Smith gave it the name of , which he said was formerly given to a certain valley,  where Adam, previous to his death, called his children together and  blessed them. The interpretation in English is “The valley of God,  in which Adam blessed his children.” Many of the church became  elated with the idea of settling in and round about the new town, es pecially those who had come from , as it was designed more  particularly for them. This stirred up the people of in some  degree, they saw that if this town was built up rapidly it would injure  , their county seat, and also that the Mormons would soon  overrun , and rule the county, and they did not like to live un der the laws and administration of “Joe Smith.” also  would frequently boast in his discourses of what they would do if the  mob did not let them alone,—they would fight, and they would die  upon the ground, and they would not give up their rights, &c., when,  as yet, there was no mob. But this preaching inspired the Mormons  with a fighting spirit, and some of the other citizens began to be stir red up to anger.
Shortly after the new town was established in , the presiden cy concluded to establish a settlement at the mouth of ,  in Carroll county. Accordingly and went  and purchased a number of lots in a little town, called , and [p. 28]
and 7, a difficulty arose between them and the church, on account of their having entered the town plot and some other lands in their own names; but, on an investigation of the matter they gave the town plot and some other lands into the hands of the , as the property of the church. However, perfect reconciliation of feelings was not restored; but in the fall of 1837 Smith and , and others, came to on a visit. A general meeting was called for the church to choose whether they would have the old presidency rule any longer over them or not. Their old difficulties were talked over, and so far reconciled, that they still choose to have and their presidents; but, in the winter following, the old difficulty broke out again, and the excitement rose so high that they turned them out of their presidential office, and and two others served as presidents, pro tempore, until Smith and arrived, and even until now. When Smith and arrived the church was much pleased, and supposed that things would be managed right by them, and they would have better times; but it was not long before the old feelings began to be stirred up between the church and the dissenters. Complaints were made to the authorities of the church against them, upon which they immediately withdrew from the church. The church in had been doing well, with the exception of these little difficulties among themselves, until the first presidency came to the , and began to move things to their own notions. Many of the church had settled in , and, to all appearance, lived as peaceably with their neighbors, as people generally do; but not long after Smith and arrived in , they went to and pitched upon a place to build a town. was already on the ground with his family. They laid out a town and began to settle it pretty rapidly; Smith gave it the name of , which he said was formerly given to a certain valley, where Adam, previous to his death, called his children together and blessed them. The interpretation in English is “The valley of God, in which Adam blessed his children.” Many of the church became elated with the idea of settling in and round about the new town, especially those who had come from , as it was designed more particularly for them. This stirred up the people of in some degree, they saw that if this town was built up rapidly it would injure , their county seat, and also that the Mormons would soon overrun , and rule the county, and they did not like to live under the laws and administration of “Joe Smith.” also would frequently boast in his discourses of what they would do if the mob did not let them alone,—they would fight, and they would die upon the ground, and they would not give up their rights, &c., when, as yet, there was no mob. But this preaching inspired the Mormons with a fighting spirit, and some of the other citizens began to be stirred up to anger.
Shortly after the new town was established in , the presidency concluded to establish a settlement at the mouth of , in Carroll county. Accordingly and went and purchased a number of lots in a little town, called , and [p. 28]
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