John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 36
image
This the has since told me was a mistake, for he was  at at the time; and, moreover, and other  officers had full power to act when necessary, without an order  from him.
called upon for more militia,  but before they arrived the Mormons concluded to give up the  ground and leave the place, and the citizens of Carroll agreed to  pay them for their improvements. I never heard of any accusa tion that the people of Carroll had against the Mormons, but still  they were determined they should not settle in that county; so  they came to , about fifty waggons in number.
I have since understood that the people of Carroll did not mean  to pay them, as they had agreed, but I know not whether this be  true or not. When they came from I discovered that the  feelings of many were much exasperated at the treatment they had  received at , and especially at having been obliged to leave the  place. News also followed them that the citizens were coming from   to , with the cannon, for the purpose of driving the  Mormons from . They took two Mormons prisoners  on their way, and told them that they meant to drive the Mormons  from to , and from to h——l. Smith and  others appeared much excited in feeling. “They (the church) had  been driven from place to place; their property destroyed; their rights  as citizens taken from them; abuse upon abuse practised upon them  from time to time; they had sought for redress through the medium of  the law, but never could get it; the State of refused to pro tect them in their rights; the executive had been petitioned many  times, but never would do any thing for them.” This, in substance,  had been their talk for months: “And the ,” they said “while  they were at , refused to do any thing for them, but said that  they must take care of themselves.” Now they meant to do it, for  they found that they must take care of themselves, as they could  get help from no other quarter. Moreover, they said, that they had  found out that several members of the church had dissented in feeling,  and were operating against them by carrying evil reports to their  enemies, thereby increasing the excitement, and endangering their  lives; and now they were determined to clear them out or spill their  blood in the streets; moreover they meant to make clean work now,  and expel the mob from and then from . I  asked Smith whether he thought they could hold out in that course and  prosper in carrying it into effect. He answered they would, or die  in the attempt. I answered that they would have the whole state upon  them. Smith replied no; they would not have the whole state on  them, but only that party which was governed by a mob spirit, and  they were not very numerous: and they, when they found they would  have to fight, would not be so fond of gathering together against them.  I plainly saw that their feelings were much irritated, and they determi ned on their course; I therefore said no more. I had highly disappro ved of their course for months past, and had taken no part in their  warfare. I knew that they were jealous of me as a dissenter, and [p. 36]
This the has since told me was a mistake, for he was at at the time; and, moreover, and other officers had full power to act when necessary, without an order from him.
called upon for more militia, but before they arrived the Mormons concluded to give up the ground and leave the place, and the citizens of Carroll agreed to pay them for their improvements. I never heard of any accusation that the people of Carroll had against the Mormons, but still they were determined they should not settle in that county; so they came to , about fifty waggons in number.
I have since understood that the people of Carroll did not mean to pay them, as they had agreed, but I know not whether this be true or not. When they came from I discovered that the feelings of many were much exasperated at the treatment they had received at , and especially at having been obliged to leave the place. News also followed them that the citizens were coming from to , with the cannon, for the purpose of driving the Mormons from . They took two Mormons prisoners on their way, and told them that they meant to drive the Mormons from to , and from to h——l. Smith and others appeared much excited in feeling. “They (the church) had been driven from place to place; their property destroyed; their rights as citizens taken from them; abuse upon abuse practised upon them from time to time; they had sought for redress through the medium of the law, but never could get it; the State of refused to protect them in their rights; the executive had been petitioned many times, but never would do any thing for them.” This, in substance, had been their talk for months: “And the ,” they said “while they were at , refused to do any thing for them, but said that they must take care of themselves.” Now they meant to do it, for they found that they must take care of themselves, as they could get help from no other quarter. Moreover, they said, that they had found out that several members of the church had dissented in feeling, and were operating against them by carrying evil reports to their enemies, thereby increasing the excitement, and endangering their lives; and now they were determined to clear them out or spill their blood in the streets; moreover they meant to make clean work now, and expel the mob from and then from . I asked Smith whether he thought they could hold out in that course and prosper in carrying it into effect. He answered they would, or die in the attempt. I answered that they would have the whole state upon them. Smith replied no; they would not have the whole state on them, but only that party which was governed by a mob spirit, and they were not very numerous: and they, when they found they would have to fight, would not be so fond of gathering together against them. I plainly saw that their feelings were much irritated, and they determined on their course; I therefore said no more. I had highly disapproved of their course for months past, and had taken no part in their warfare. I knew that they were jealous of me as a dissenter, and [p. 36]
Page 36